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WORKPLACE COLLABORATION


IT ALL DEPENDS ON YOUR LINE OF SIGHT


BY DR. SHARI FRISINGER HOW OFTEN DOES ‘SEEING YOUR MOUNTAINS’ STOP YOU FROM ‘STEPPING ON OR OVER YOUR MOLEHILLS’?


DOM Sam asked Alex to work late to help Jim prepare the aircraft. DOM Sam stressed how important it was for the job to be done expediently and thoroughly. Alex was not pleased, and his displeasure became obvious in his tone of voice, curt words and amplifi ed behaviors. What began as a simple request to help another team member became, in Alex’s mind, a punishment and proof of his low worth to the department and lack of respect from the DOM. In fact, the more Alex allowed the situation to fester in his mind, the faster it grew from the proverbial molehill to the overpowering, overwhelming and all-encompassing mountain.


This type of situation, with the details changed, can happen to even the calmest, most objective director. Yet are there times that you, for whatever reason, blew a minor or even moderate situation out of proportion? Looking back, you


realized you pulled that knee-jerk reaction, and could not get it out of your head. One reason may be that you took your eyes off your big picture, your result, your future. Of course, there may be other reasons and those reasons may be justifi ed or


rationalized. This article will look at those times we struggle and get too caught up in the moment, when we cannot focus on our long-term goals; those times we become consumed by the situation occurring today and right in front of us.


40 DOMmagazine.com | dec 2017 | jan 2018


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