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S.E.A.L. AVIATION


out. The regulatory body approved the flights into this airstrip under the condition that a person at the airstrip communicated weather conditions to the pilot before he entered the valley. There was no turning back or going around once you entered the valley. The pilot brought in the loggers who were beginning their


rotation, loaded the lucky crew going out, turned around and headed down the airstrip in order to exit the valley. All was normal until, as the landing gear was coming up, the number one engine lost power as the turbo boost went from 42” of manifold pressure (MAP) down to 28”. The aircraft swung toward the left valley wall, but a quick application


of right rudder straightened the aircraft. He quickly applied rudder trim and tried to determine what was happening. Suddenly, the number one engine jumped up from 28” MAP not to 42”, but to more like 52”, swinging them towards the right valley wall. His left foot pushed the rudder petal to its limit, but they were still facing the wall. As he told me, he had no idea what was going on, but all he knew was they were about to die if this kept up. He pulled the power off of both engines and landed in the river. One logger failed to exit the sinking aircraft.


FUEL LEAK


We also offer:


Non-Destructive Testing and Structural Repair support 24/7 any where in the world


A rapid response team ready to deploy to your location for your AOG maintenance and emergencies


FAA and EASA Certified Repair Station 9JBR401B


STOPS THE AIRCRAFT


HERE


At S.E.A.L. Aviation we repair fuel leaks the first time, everytime! That’s why we offer a 181 Day Warranty on all of our leak repair work.


The culprit was found in the turbocharger waste gate and its controller. The waste gate actuator has a fail safe spring in it so that in the event of loss of oil pressure, the spring will push the waste gate open causing the engine to become normally aspirated. Controlling oil enters the waste gate actuator through an orifice that Teflon tape had blocked momentarily. A piece of Teflon tape was in the actuator and pieces of Teflon tape were found on the controller. A plumbing fitting had been replaced that had originally been installed with Teflon tape on the pipe threads. The replacement fitting did not have Teflon tape applied, but pieces from the previous fitting remained in the actuator threads and entered the actuator when the replacement fitting pushed them in.


S.E.A.L. Aviation 1011 N.W. 51ST. Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 33309 www.SEALaviation.com | 954-492-3522 | Sales@SEALaviation.com


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