search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MANAGEMENT IN AVIATION HISTORY BENCH MARKS


This Sensenich propeller moves with the


breeze outside the entrance to the AutoBooks/ AeroBooks store in Burbank, California. Photo: Koontz


THE FAMILY BUSINESS OF PROPELLERS BY GIACINTA BRADLEY KOONTZ Among the associated inventions tested by the Wrights


brothers for their glider-turned-aeroplane at Kitty Hawk, NC and Huff man Prairie, OH, was their design of a propeller. Many aviation historians consider it one of their greatest contributions to aviation. I confess that I am a fan of propellers in almost any form. I can’t resist a child’s toy airplane which, with the fl ick of a fi nger sets the propeller spinning. I pause to admire re-purposed old, cracked, and broken propellers decorating offi ce walls, or hung over a garage or hangar door. I like clocks and fl oor lamps made with propellers. I have photographed dozens of business signs of all sizes which use a propeller. I recently visited the Autobooks/Aerobooks Store in Burbank, CA, where a wooden propeller gently revolved as it hung above the entrance. The logo was faded. Was it a Hartzell, a Hamilton Standard, a rare Jacuzzi, or was it a fake? As soon as I determined “SB” showing beneath layers of varnish, I knew it was a Sensenich. Founded by individual inventors, Hamilton propellers (1909) merged to become Hamilton-Standard in 1929 and Hartzell was founded in 1917. But, like Orville and Wilbur Wright, two more propeller manufacturers were formed by teams of brothers.


THE BROTHERS FROM ITALY In 1910, brothers Valeriano, Francesco, and Rachele Jacuzzi were the fi rst of thirteen siblings to emigrate to the U.S.


20 DOMmagazine.com | dec 2017 | jan 2018


from Italy. They were soon joined by the entire family and settled in Southern California. The eldest son, Rachele, had briefl y studied engineering in Milan, Italy, and was self-taught in the science of physics and aeronautics. In 1911, four of the brothers worked at a ranch owned by aviator and fl ight school operator, Earle Remington. While employed as Remington’s mechanic, Rachele conceived a design for a wooden propeller adaptable to a wide variety of aircraft types. To market his propeller, Rachele took samples to the


Panama-Pacifi c International Exposition of 1915-1916. While there, he was hired as a temporary mechanic for the Christoff erson Aviation Company, and among the visiting aviators he found his fi rst customer. With an endorsement and promised forthcoming sales, Rachele returned to join his brothers in Los Angeles to set up their fi rst propeller shop. One of their original designs was a long and narrow propeller with tapered ends which they called, the “Toothpick.” The Hall-Scott Motor Company also had a factory


in Los Angeles and became a major customer of Jacuzzi propellers. When Hall-Scott moved to Berkeley, the Jacuzzi family business followed. The Jacuzzi Brothers’ sales brochure lists several propellers, hubs and clubs. The wooden club propellers were less tapered in design and made strictly for testing aircraft power plants. By 1917 the Jacuzzi propellers were selling well but their business declined after WWI. After just two short years


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68