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BUSINESS NEWS


An image from KLM’s ‘Fly Responsibly’ campaign


MP urges industry to ‘make case for travel’


Corporate travel leaders challenged on carbon and plastics. Ian Taylor reports


Te industry must act faster to ‘de-carbonise’ and cut plastics in response to increasing environmental concerns, corporate travel leaders have been told. Conservative MP James Heappey


challenged members of the Business Travel Association (BTA), formerly the Guild of Travel Management Companies, saying: “Where do you sit on the growing challenge of de-carbonisation?” Heappey, parliamentary private


secretary to transport secretary Chris Grayling, said travel firms must find “a


64 11 JULY 2019


beter way of doing business”. He hit out at airlines for not


cuting single-use plastics from flights, saying: “You should not have to fly business class to have a plastic-free flight. It’s an outrage that when you get on a night flight there are 400 blankets wrapped in plastic and 400 pairs of headphones in plastic.” Te industry must act because


flying “is at odds” with the need to reduce carbon use, he said, arguing: “We have to make the case for travel.” Heappey insisted: “No one is arguing all flying will cease,


but it’s almost impossible to get electric-powered long-haul aircraſt off the ground.” He dismissed those, including


US president Trump, who dispute evidence for global warming, saying: “Trump talks bollocks on climate.” Heappey told the BTA: “If you


use a long-haul carrier that makes use of single-use plastics and plastic wrappers, that reflects badly on you.


Continued on page 62 travelweekly.co.uk


BUSINESS NEWS


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