search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
GROUND TRANSPORT


“Ground transport is something that often gets lost in


part of Europcar, says there should be no surcharge pricing during peak or busy periods. “We offer competitive prices with set rates for point-to-point journeys, meaning customers enjoy the consistency and transparency of knowing how much they are paying, irrespective of the time of day or traffic conditions.” For Cabfind, it’s not just about providing technology but how clients are addressing issues, such as compliance rates. “As always, compliance is the key,” says commercial director Daniel Price. “Our technology is designed to fit seamlessly within existing policies. But true adoption will always require a complete wraparound service. Without people behind the scenes, there is no way to effectively manage the supply chain or deal with incidents.” Wesley Bishop, Gett’s UK head of enterprise, says that technology is also “bridging the gap” between traditional taxi services and the ride-hailing newcomers. Taxi app Gett also owns ground transport platform One Transport. “The transport industry has found


itself moving from being in a car service competition to a technology competition,” says Bishop. “We are noticing that any new technology that becomes available is being adapted to suit ground transport.”


74 BBT July/August 2018 The content, data and functionality


offered by ground transport platforms continues to become more sophisticated. The CMAC Group’s platform, for example, has integrated suppliers such as Autocab, iCabbi, Addison Lee, Gett/One Transport and Auriga. It can also provide live tracking and detailed journey information.


BALANCING PRIORITIES While technology has been the main driver of change for ground transport, Addison Lee’s Andy Boland makes the point that “technology won’t see you safely through your front door or return a lost laptop.” “A truly superior service differentiates


based on quality – of people, services and delivery,” says Boland, as well as “providing the consistent service and peace of mind the corporate customer needs”. It can also save up to 40 per cent on ground transport costs, he adds. Groundscope’s John McCallion agrees


travel buyers have to balance the twin priorities of cost control and offering a “reliable and safe service”. “If you are being collected at 5am for a


flight, you need the car to be on time and this reliability is worth a small premium,” he adds. “Buyers also require detailed MI reporting so they can analyse ground


the mix. We want to tackle it properly”


transport spend and travel behaviour so that all ground transport expenses are as visible as air and hotel spend.” It’s also clear that more traditional ground transport operators see an advantage in emphasising their duty-of-care credentials to corporate clients, especially when this has been an area of concern with the ride- hailing services and also local taxi firms in some destinations. Craig Chambers, group chief executive of


TBR Global Chauffeuring, says: “Businesses are acutely aware of the importance of being able to track their travellers’ movements at all times and avoid them being ‘unaccounted for’ when they jump in a local taxi to take them to the airport or their hotel.” And Brunel’s Sampson adds: “Providing a


safe service without incident is paramount. Our clients travel globally with the reassurances that all our vehicles are fully licensed, insured and maintained, drivers are fully vetted and trained, and all our vehicles are fully tracked.”


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104