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ByCATHERINE CHETWYND


Chris Job, chief operating officer at global security consultants Drum Cussac Group. “One of our clients said, ‘We develop and


encourage a culture of compliance through security enablement so that people realise we are not here to frustrate, we are here to help, and they are compliant because we are helpful’,” he notes. The first task is to define risk. This differs according to the destination, the sector in which the traveller works in, how expe- rienced the traveller is, and more. Drum Cussac codes risk from green through red and defines it on a scale of 1 to 5, moving in increments of 0.25. “This allows us more nuances. Having to push it from, say, level 3 to level 4 could have implications for how a client operates if they impose a travel ban at level 4,” Job says. Drum Cussac has five categories of risk: security, political, infrastructure, medical and environmental and breaks each of these down further. Under political comes corrup- tion, rule of law, government stability and sanctions, for example.


MEET HALF-WAY However, travellers should also do their own research. Just as a company has a duty-of- care to look after employees, so do they


have a reciprocal duty-of-loyalty. Included in this is being informed. Risk management specialists will have destination informa- tion on their websites and employers may have comments and links on an intranet. High-profile events are not the only threat. “It is also important to consider incidents such as medical emergencies, accidents while travelling or every day illness, effects of jetlag, lost luggage,” says Paul East ,chief operating officer, UK/Europe & Americas for Wings Travel Management.


“Traveller tracking should be in place as a bare minimum, but for clients operating in the oil and gas sector, for example, who are frequently going to high-risk destinations, then a comprehensive risk management and safety plan will be a given.” A safety and security mobile app can


“We encourage a culture of compliance so that people realise we are not here to frustrate, we are here to help”


Medical screening before departure is


a tricky but essential area. People are not always honest about their state of health but if an existing condition flares up while travelling, or they lose vital medication, they will need help. Companies that have an occupational health department may be better equipped to have such conversations. Technology also plays a part, but traveller tracking is just a starting point. “Corporates need to ensure all their travel is booked according to policy, so that employers or their TMC can immediately pull reports on where travellers are located,” says East.


contain vital information about a destina- tion, GPS to allow real-time identification of travellers’ whereabouts and an OK button, so that employees can instantly let their manager/risk management company know they are fine. In an event of more urgency, “a telephone symbol in our app calls us direct and an SOS button contacts us in five seconds and we ring back”, says Drum Cussac’s Job.


Clarity also has a relationship with Ijet


and its Go2Track app provides GPS tracking, trip booking information and updates, and the ability to contact Clarity 24/7. Desti- nation information and alerts are sent to employees while they are travelling, with analysis of events and advice. Travel manag- ers can use the app to communicate directly with affected travellers. In the event of an incident, a risk man-


agement company needs to know it can act without hesitation, so having an insurance policy that covers that is crucial, so that there is no hold-up while a crisis management


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


BBT July/August 2018


37


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