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all-volunteer board of directors has worked hard to advance women in aviation and, along with their devoted sponsors, they have built the largest scholarship program in the helicopter industry. Awards range from online educational opportunities to company sponsored turbine transition and/or re-currency training. The newest sponsor, ForeFlight, is offering two ForeFlight Pro subscriptions and in-person training in use of the software. The largest value scholarship, the Airbus Flight Training Scholarship (valued at $14,000) provides both ground and flight training for the AS350 at the Airbus Factory School in Texas, helping a woman receive an endorsement needed to advance her career.


The Erickson’s Vertical Reference/External Load Scholarship (valued at $6,000) is set for one deserving Whirly-Girl. This scholarship helps fill the large gap that exists between the skills she gains in an intermediate level job and the additional endorsement requirements that exist in many higher-hour helicopter job postings. This training gap is also addressed with the Night Flight Concepts Night Vision Goggles Initial Pilot Qualification Scholarship (valued at $12,000) which opens up career opportunities in many fields, including law enforcement. Additionally, the Thurn-Herr Annual


Advanced Training Scholarship (valued at $11,000) can be applied towards any rating needed to advance to the next level of the helicopter industry.


Many of the awards this year addressed helicopter safety concerns. This includes two Robinson Safety Courses in the R22 or R44 and the R66 (combined value: $7,500), Antipodean Aviation and Embry-Riddle’s online wire and obstacle avoidance course (valued at $220), Garmin on-site training to safely integrate equipment into flight operations (each valued at $795), inadvertent IMC training included with the FlightSafety International Bell 206 scholarship (valued at $10,000), and how to react in an aircraft ditching emergency at the Survival Systems USA Aircraft Ditching Course (valued at $1,400). The Oregon Aero CRM/AMRM Instructor Training Scholarship (valued at $2,000) helps raise the safety awareness of the entire industry by providing a Whirly-Girl with the information and practice to become an effective facilitator in the principles of crew resource management. She can then return to her company or school and disseminate those important principles to a wider audience.


Best of 2017 @Safety USHST


United States Helicopter Safety Team


PROMOTING SAFETY AMONG THE PILOT AND INSTRUCTOR RANKS


After analyzing dozens of helicopter accidents that resulted in fatalities for pilots and passengers, the U.S. Helicopter Safety Team (www.USHST.org) has uncovered five vital action items for pilots and six focus areas where flight instructors can improve safety in the helicopter industry.


5


Vitally Important Safety Actions for Helicopter Pilots


Take Time for Your Walkaround – The pilot in command is responsible for determining the airworthiness of the aircraft he or she is operating. An adequate preflight inspection and final walkaround is key to determining the condition of an aircraft prior to flight. In addition, post-flight inspection can help to identify issues prior to the next flight. The USHST believes that pilots would benefit from better guidance on how and why to conduct these inspections, as well as increased attention to their importance.


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