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From The Desk of The Editor


What a Difference a Year Can Make! Newt Gingrich, American politician, historian, and


author once said, “Perseverance is the hard work you do after you get tired of doing the hard work you already did.” The helicopter world is but a small niche industry in the larger macroeconomy, but in my short 27 years as a participant, I am always amazed how it bends to change and perseveres through tough times.


From mid-2015 to early 2017, there were economic storms pounding our industry’s shores. Waves of crashing oil prices, military cutbacks, global economic slowdowns, VA funding cuts, political and policy shifts, and several other factors crashed over most everyone in our industry, which included helicopter manufacturers, pilots, leasing companies, operators, and all the support sectors that connect us all. In other words, the last 18 to 24 months was tough sailing for most of our businesses.


Looking ahead to 2018, there’s an optimistic buzz in the air. We at Rotorcraft Pro have our ear to the ground; many of the business leaders we hear and indicators we see are pointing to calmer weather.


On the oil price front, we have seen a slow-but-steady increase from the 2016 lows of sub-$30 per barrel, to the near $60 level as of this writing. According to Arthur E. Berman, a petroleum geologist with 36 years of oil and gas industry experience, and contributor to oilprices.com, “Oil prices are poised to rise in early 2018 as data suggests oil supplies are tightening and that higher prices are likely in the relatively near future.”


This single factor will ripple across many sectors and will have a positive impact on operators, lessors, manufacturers, and jobs. If you’re looking for an excellent bellwether that connects oil prices to the health of helicopter markets, look no further than the leasing companies. One such company is Waypoint Leasing with $1.6 billion in helicopter assets spread across 30 countries. In a late 2017 Aviation Finance article, Clark McGinn, a senior VP at Waypoint Leasing indicated, “The combination of the oil price crash, CHC’s Chapter 11 (bankruptcy) and general economic woes created the perfect storm for the oil & gas industry and for the helicopter market over the past 18 months. But the good news is that we’re seeing some stability come back into both markets.”


2 Nov/Dec 2017


Additionally, there have been a few other factors changing the landscape. The U.S. government administration change has improved enthusiasm in the business community with efforts to overhaul the cumbersome tax system and reduce regulation. Military spending is growing and global markets like Latin America and China are expanding or opening. All of which are good for the health of our industry.


So, as we look ahead to 2018, it’s my hope that the optimistic buzz in the air is actually the sound of rotors turning and revenue being earned by the hard-working people and businesses of the helicopter industry. Last but not least, from the Rotorcraft Pro team, we would like to wish our readers, writers, photographers, and advertisers a safe holiday season and a smooth takeoff into the new year.


Lyn Burks, Editor-In-Chief


Publisher Brig Bearden


brig@rotorcraftpro.com Editor-In-Chief Lyn Burks


lyn.burks@rotorcraftpro.com Assistant Editor Pam Landis


pam.landis@rotorcraftpro.com Account Executive Teri Rivas


teri.rivas@rotorcraftpro.com Layout Design Bryan Matuskey Boris Grauden


production@rotorcraftpro.com Online Accounts Manager Lynnette Burks


lynnette.burks@rotorcraftpro.com Copy Editor


Rick Weatherford rick@rotorcraftpro.com Social Media Guru Laura Lentz


Subscription / Circulation Manager Pam Fulmer


Contributing Writers


James Careless Joanna Nellans Rick Weatherford Sharon Desfor Matt Johnson


Randy Mains Brad McNally Tim Pruitt


Randy Rowles Scott Skola


Rotorcraft Pro®


is published six times


a year and mailed out on or around the 10th of every other month by: Rotorcraft Pro Media Netwok, Inc. Rotorcraft Pro® is distributed free to qualified subscrib- ers. Non-qualified subscription rates are $57.00 per year in the U.S. and Canada, $125.00 per year for foreign subscribers (surface mail). U.S. postage paid at Fall River, Wisconsin, and additional mailing offices. Publisher is not liable for all content


(including editorial and illustrations pro- vided by advertisers) of ads published, and does not accept responsibility for any claims made against the publisher. It is the advertiser’s or agency’s responsibility to obtain appropriate releases on any item or individuals pictured in ads. Repro- duction of this magazine in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission from the publisher.


Corporate Officers Brig Bearden / COO Lyn Burks / CEO Mailing Address


367 SW Bluebird Ct., Ft. White, FL 32038


Toll Free: 877.768.5550 Fax: 561.424.8036 www. rotorcraftpro.com


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