search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Grace from Above: Mercy Air Supports Africans in Need IN THE BUSH, YOU’RE OFTEN IT


According to Reuter, one of the biggest challenges is finding the right people to perform this type of work. One needs to be to be a missionary pilot, crew member, and mechanic; “self-reliant” pretty much sums it up.


One of the bases that serves the Zambezi Delta region is located at a sugar mill in a small town. This town is where roads, electricity and cell coverage end. Reuter calls it “the end of civilization.” With a small fuel farm and conex boxes for storage and crew sleeping quarters, it’s an


austere environment and existence. The success of pilots and crew members as missionary aviation team members hinges less on their core skills, such as piloting or turning wrenches, and more on their ability to communicate well and be highly resourceful with few resources.


Take for example a pilot with an A&P background. On any given day, he or she could be flying the helicopter in a variety of situations, such as sling-loading food into a village or transporting medical personnel and equipment to set up a bush clinic. Additionally, the pilot may be working on the helicopter, repairing the tractor that


tows the fuel tank, negotiating with a local immigration officer for a border crossing, or establishing diplomatic relations with a tribal chief.


“Because of who we partner with, the DNA of our organization, and the people we serve, our team members must not only have a personal relationship with Christ, but also be willing to do whatever else it takes to live in a third-world area and safely keep a ministry going. It’s definitely more than just a pilot or mechanic job,” said Reuter.


BUSH TRAVEL TIME VS AIRCRAFT TRAVEL


1 DAY OF VEHICLE TRAVEL TIME ON AN UNIMPROVED ROAD =


1 HOUR IN FIXED-WING


1 HOUR OF TREKKING ON THE GROUND =


1 MINUTE OF HELICOPTER TIME rotorcraftpro.com 65


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87