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EXECUTIVE WATCH


ROMAIN TRAPP President and Head of North America, Airbus Helicopters Inc. By Rick Weatherford


The Airbus Helicopters president and head of the North America region for helicopters was once so bashful he was afraid to phone anyone he didn’t know. “I was really super shy. I had to write down in advance every word I planned to say in a call,” Romain Trapp says. So, the college accounting and finance student got fed up with his handicap and devised a strategy to overcome it. “I came to the point where enough was enough and I began to force myself out of my shyness,” he says. “For


example, I volunteered to organize a conference at my college; it forced me to interact with people. Eventually, I worked my way out of my shyness, so that I now have no problem speaking to an audience of 200 people.” That’s a good thing, because presiding over a global original equipment manufacturer (OEM) like Airbus Helicopters is not a cubicle-in-the-bowels- of-a-building position. It requires someone who can get out into the rotorcraft world, see how it’s changing, and react. When


pressed to talk about his personal strengths as a top corporate executive, the humble leader says, “My strength, I think, is my ability to grasp the big picture and develop strategy from that view. Also, I develop a sense of belonging to the team as soon as I start a new job. You’ll notice that when I talk, I use the word ‘we’ and never ‘them’ nor ‘I.’ Finally, I have developed an ability to adapt to changing circumstances because I’ve had different responsibilities in different countries.”


14 Nov/Dec 2020


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