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HANGAR TALK Industry news relevant to your business


HANGAR TALK


development, certification and entry into service of the next- generation SH09 single-engine helicopter, with Leonardo’s strong support. In parallel, he will position Kopter as Leonardo Helicopters’ competence center for new light helicopters.


In 2019 Viola held the position of head of blades and composite rotor heads at the Production Centre of Excellence at the Anagni plant. From 2017 to 2019, he was the head of civil/ dual-use light platforms within Product Line Management.


Marco Viola Appointed New CEO of Kopter Group


Following a board resolution of the Kopter Group AG, Marco Viola recently assumed the responsibility for general management of the company as its new chief executive officer.


Viola brings to Kopter a long-established career in aerospace, including a variety of positions at Leonardo Helicopters in addition to his previous role leading the integration process of Kopter into Leonardo. During this time, he acquired in-depth knowledge of Kopter, its talented teams, and the SH09 program. Marco Viola will now lead Kopter to successfully complete the


Viola joined AgustaWestland (today, the helicopter division of Leonardo) in 2003 as a manager in the field of governmental customers and maintenance service until early 2008. He was then appointed head of AgustaWestland customer regional support & services C]centre for the Middle East. At the end of 2010, Viola joined AgustaWestland’s Production Unit as head of aircraft repair and overhaul at the Frosinone plant, with responsibility for the Centre of Excellence of several core competencies (maintenance / overhaul and retrofit of military helicopters).


Viola holds a graduate degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Pisa. He is Italian, married, and father of three.


up to 118-156 MHz, and optional embedded UHF 225-400MHz capabilities. The GDR radios are designed to interface to a host controller/display – including the Genesys IDU-680 EFIS – via RS-232 or ARINC-429 serial interfaces. The GDR’s standard transmit power is 16 watts, with a 25-watt option available for those operators requiring longer-range communications. The TSO approvals for the radio include TSO-C34e, C35d, C36e, C40c, C128a, and C169a.


“The GDR radio line offers unprecedented capabilities in a compact, lightweight package,” said Gordon Pratt, VP of business development. “With legacy radios becoming challenging to repair or costly to replace, a radio solution like our GDR will be popular among new aircraft manufacturers and operators looking for options to keep their fleets flying.”


Genesys Aerosystems New Digital Radio Line Receives TSO Approval


Genesys Aerosystems recently received FAA Technical Standard Order (TSO) approval for the Genesys Digital Radio (GDR) product line.


The GDR is a family of 11 remote-mounted, software-definable radios that feature a combined VOR/localizer/glideslope, marker beacon, VHF communication with a frequency range of


30 Nov/Dec 2020


The GDR is capable of voice communications between aircraft, ground stations, and other aircraft, and capable of receiving and processing VOR beacon signals for navigation and instrument landing systems (LOC/GS/MBR). The radio can operate up to 55,000 feet and between negative 55 C and positive 70 C, and meets the most demanding helicopter environmental requirements. With selectable frequency spacing between 8.33 and 25 kHz, the GDR is a solution for operators worldwide. The radio has achieved Design Assurance Level “A,” the highest certification level for software, as well as MIL-STD 704E and 810G accommodating all segments of the global aviation market.


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