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Sunfloat® floating PV panels


The Ocean Cleanup


Seaqualizer, spring balanced offshore access bridge


Hull Vane® energy saving device


reduced gas volume. These benefits will lead to a range of new solutions for offshore motion compensation and will also lead to improvements and cost savings in (engaging) existing heave compensation systems.


The model was equipped with several active force feedback control systems to overcome this problem. MARIN further assisted with the development of a numerical model of the ship in waves and the active heave compensation. With the tuned and validated numerical model,


additional environmental conditions, not included in the basin tests, can be simulated numerically. www.nhlo.nl/seaqualizer


Hull Vane® energy saving device The Hull Vane is a patented, fixed foil located below the stern of a yacht or fast ship, for energy saving and improved seakeeping. It influences the stern’s wave pattern and creates hydrodynamic lift, which is partially oriented forwards and results in a reduction of the ship’s resistance. The performance of the Hull


Vane depends on the ship’s length, speed and hull shape in the aft section. The reduction in resistance ranges from 5% to 15% for suitable ships. In specific cases, savings up to 20% are possible.


The Hull Vane concept was tested at MARIN by a team of experts from the founder company Van Oossanen. The tests avoided getting too involved in details at an early stage. The optimised settings of the foil were used for the further development of CFD studies. www.hullvane.nl


report 19


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