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NUTRITION AND HEAL ▶▶▶TH


SDPP is a safe feed ingredient – here is why


African Swine Fever (ASF) not only affected pigs – it has also led to a series of bans of feed ingredients. Although the virus has been shown to be capable of being transmitted through feedstuffs, the ingredient spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) is not one of them. Here’s why.


BY JAVIER POLO, LOURENS HERES AND ISABELLE D. KALMAR, TECHNICAL COMMITTEE, EAPA


S Virus Envelope


PRRSV PRV


PEDV PEDV SVDV ASFV


14


Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes


pray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) is a feed ingredient with highly digestible proteins and amino acids, and significant concentrations of functional bioactive components including immunoglobulins, transferrin,


growth factors, peptides, and other biologically active compo- nents. Numerous peer-review publications document the ben- eficial effects of feeding diets containing SDPP to weaned pigs on growth, feed intake, feed efficiency, and survival compared to other high-quality protein sources. Spray-dried plasma was selected as number 6 of the top-10 of most important discov- eries in swine nutrition in the past 100 years during a presenta- tion at the centennial assembly of the American Society of Ani- mal Science (ASAS) in 2008. In addition, spray-dried plasma is nowadays used in sow milk replacers to reduce pre-weaning mortality and improve animal welfare. Spray-dried plasma and blood derivatives are ingredients which have been used worldwide for more than 30 years,


Table 1 – Spray-drying at 80°C inactivates swine viruses.


Thermal stability Low


Medium Low Low


Medium High


Foto 2 > 4.0


> 5.0 > 5.2 > 3.6 > 6.0 4.1


Inactivation logarithm


Reference


Polo and others (2005) Polo and others (2005) Pujols & Segales (2014) Gerber and others (2014) Pujols and others (2007) Blázquez and others (2018)


▶ ALL ABOUT FEED | Volume 27, No. 3, 2019


proving its use under different environmental conditions. Spray-dried plasma is probably one of the more scrutinised swine ingredients, with multiple peer review studies to this topic. Furthermore, plasma producers align their procedures with the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for viral safety for human blood transfusion products. Available data demonstrate that SDPP is safe for multiple viruses of concern in the swine industry, including African Swine Fever virus (ASFv).


Common procedures The members of the European Animal Protein Association (EAPA) and the North America Spray-Dried Blood Products Producers Association (NASDBPP) represent more than 65% of the producers in the world. These associations have devel- oped common procedures that follow WHO guidelines on viral inactivation and removal procedures. According to the WHO guidelines, viral safety is derived from three comple- mentary approaches during manufacturing:


1. Donor selection For donor selection, only blood collected in commercial abat- toirs under official inspection from animals that have been in- spected and passed as fit for slaughter for human consumption is the exclusive raw material for the manufacturing of blood products. This precludes collection of blood from clinically sick animals or animals from restriction areas where OIE notifiable disease such as African Swine Fever (ASF), Classical Swine Fever (CSF) or Food and Mouth Disease (FMD) have been reported.


PHOTO: APC


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