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COMPOUND FEED ▶▶▶


the Feed Compass Framework, we are testing its use in part- nership with major companies and their supply chains.” Our ambition is that the Feed Compass tool will support the food industry in ensuring animals are fed sustainably and help to future-proof our food system in the long term. Dr Mitchell notes that Feed Compass looks to tools such as LEAP and GFLI. LEAP (Livestock Environmental Assessment and Perfor- mance) is a multi-stakeholder initiative led by the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation that has developed guidelines for measurement of the environmental impact of animal feed. The Global Feed LCA Institute (GFLI) is an important in- dustry initiative that aims to develop a free and publicly avail- able feed LCA database and tool, primarily for feed compa- nies. “These tools help in the decision making and enable understanding of the sustainability parameters better and at the same time look beyond economics and productivity.” So, what about soy for example, a major ingredient in animal di- ets? Dr Mitchell: “The big challenge with soy is that in aqua- culture we see a shift from fish meal based diets to more veg- etable protein diets. Often, fish meal is then replaced with soy, hence increasing the demand for soy on the market. In this case, the potential we see is to grow the volume of sus- tainable soy instead of advocating just a ban on using soy in livestock and fish diets. Almost 80% of soy produced world- wide is used as livestock feed, with much of it being cultivat- ed in Latin America, placing its rainforests and other high val- ue landscapes at risk. Of the 256 million tonnes of soy used in animal feed per year, only around 2.2 million tonnes is certi- fied sustainable soy. So there is huge potential here to grow the certified soy volume. But we also look at strengthening the sustainable soy standards and aim for a fair sharing of the costs of sustainable soy production across the value chain. We also welcome initiatives such as the EU protein plan to grow protein crops such as soy more locally.”


Making better sustainable decisions “Animal protein consumption is growing rapidly in some are- as in the world such as Asia and we want to enable a future for protein that ensures sustainable healthy diets for every- one. Our project works across the food system to enable peo- ple to find ways that are right for their business and create a pre-competitive collaboration platform,” says Dr Mitchell. And this is all about changing the mindset of the agri-food companies. “Business as usual is not going to meet the ur- gency of the changes we need to make when it comes to making the agri-food chain more sustainable and organisa- tions acting alone are unable to drive the change that’s need- ed across the feed system. We need to understand as a food sector how to implement frameworks regarding sustainabili- ty that actually work. The innovation regarding sustainable feed has to come from the feed industry itself, we want to ac- celerate the momentum across the animal feed system to act on it,” Dr Mitchell concludes.


Of the 256 million tonnes of soy used in animal feed per year, only around 2.2 million tonnes is certified sustainable soy. So there is huge potential here to grow the certified soy volume.


▶ ALL ABOUT FEED | Volume 27, No. 3, 2019 11


PHOTO: DREAMSTIME


PHOTO: DREAMSTIME


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