search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
CLEANING


of this, providing an inexpensive quality alternative in a sector dominated by multiple brands. Upright vacuums do have the edge on productivity, cleaning faster with on board accessories for edges and hard to reach areas. The beater bar facility within the base of the unit is particularly effective for high traffic entrances and walkways.


“Autonomous cleaning equipment


can effectively become ‘extra members of the


Automation and the future Autonomous cleaning equipment can effectively become ‘extra members of the cleaning crew’ and are perfect for repetitive


cleaning crew’ and are perfect for repetitive cleaning tasks.”


cleaning tasks. This is undoubtedly the future and will allow resources to be re-distributed so operatives can address higher level cleaning tasks that may be more public facing. Perception of a clean facility is known to improve if visibility of cleaning tasks is increased, autonomous equipment will deliver that benefit whilst improving quality and reducing stress on the cleaning team.


Support where it matters most Selecting the right vacuum for the right application is key and will significantly affect productivity and costs. Site surveys and demonstrations for key clients are available across the UK from the experienced Nilfisk team.


www.nilfisk.co.uk


www.tomorrowsfm.com


TOMORROW’S FM | 55


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68