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PRODUCT FOCUS: EDUCATIONAL/STUDENT FACILITIES


FSI explains how it is empowering students, teachers and other professionals in the education sector to support their own wellbeing and the continued improvement of their facilities.


PIONEERING CHANGE IN EDUCATION


Traditionally, any fault found in education buildings – be it a blocked toilet, spillage or broken window – would be logged via a form or ticket on their intranet site, or sent to the appropriate person by phone or email. This could then sit there for hours, days, even weeks at a time, misplaced due to more pressing issues, site staff being on holiday or simple human error.


ChatLog from FSI provides students and staff with a collective helpdesk in the palm of their hands. This unique application harnesses users’ initiative and feedback to efficiently resolve problems, protecting the wellbeing of the people, structures and assets.


The app presents students with a modern, chat-based interface, comparable to WhatsApp. This provides a familiar platform for today’s end users to highlight any issues they spot around their school building, fitting comfortably alongside the other apps on their smartphone.


When a fault is spotted, users open ChatLog and interact with a dedicated chatbot, which helps to clearly define the issue through a range of questions. The algorithm is developed between FSI and the FM team to meet the site’s unique features and functions, and ensure it employs terminology users will be familiar with. Alternatively, the chat function can be handled by a real helpdesk person, or configured to utilise both.


This approach saves time getting information to the right people over a phone call or email chain that could otherwise be forgotten over time. Instead, ChatLog’s two-way live chatting feature sends tasks directly to


46 | TOMORROW’S FM


helpdesk operators, which stay in sight with automated status updates until the issue is marked as resolved by the assigned member of staff.


The conventional concern of tasks being overlooked by other priorities is addressed by ChatLog’s ‘Me Too’ functionality. With clear display of existing issues (preventing duplication of tasks), students can quickly check if the fault they’ve spotted is on the list and, if so, click ‘Me Too’. As more users are affected, this problem automatically moves up the priority list, ensuring FM teams can suitably react to the issues affecting the most students.


ChatLog compels users to review how effectively concerns they’ve highlighted are resolved through a straightforward five-star rating system, with full audit trails and reports centrally stored inside Concept Evolution, FSI’s core CAFM/IWMS platform. This direct feedback helps FMs identify if changes are required to improve how efficiently problems are dealt with, and played a key role in FSI scoring top on occupant wellbeing analytics in Verdantix’s 2019 Product Benchmark on Space and Workplace Management Software.


A simple, yet effective tool, ChatLog has the power to revolutionise how the education sector responds to issues affecting the wellbeing of their students, staff and buildings, engaging all users to take ownership of their surroundings.


www.fsi.co.uk twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


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