search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
RECYCLING & WASTE MANAGEMENT


THE TOWN WITH NO WASTE


Tomorrow’s Cleaning Editor Martin Wharmby investigates the small town in southwestern Japan which goes above and beyond in its quest to eliminate waste.


Credit: Yuki Shimazu


From the outside, the Japanese village of Kamikatsu might seem idyllic, if a little isolated. Located on the smallest of Japan’s four main islands, Shikoku, Kamikatsu is spread across a mountainside in Tokushima Prefecture along the Katsuura River, shaded by a forest that coats the lush landscape.


It’s a picture-perfect slice of rural Japan, the polar opposite of bustling mega-cities like Tokyo or Osaka, where life moves at bullet-train speeds, population density is absurdly high, and greenery is at a premium. Kamikatsu’s peaceful utopia is a perfect antidote to the country’s many dystopian cityscapes.


The households and buildings of Kamikatsu are few in number and accommodate a population of around 1,500 or so people, spread across settlements set at different altitudes across the mountain. Like many bucolic, sparsely-populated countryside locales, the town previously kept its waste elimination simple through


34 | TOMORROW’S FM


incineration, but was able to provide small subsidies for residents purchasing household composters.


Japan is historically an environmentally-conscious and responsible society, with children taught from a young age to clean up after themselves and minimise littering. When visiting, many tourists comment on the scarcity of bins even in big cities, yet despite this the streets are always clean with minimal evidence of litter and refuse.


While the country is very conscious of littering and on the whole is very receptive to recycling, in the post-war boom years the volume of waste ballooned beyond the country’s ability to deal with it in the ideal time-consuming, environmentally-friendly methods wanted. Incinerators and landfill became the norm for several decades, as demand outstripped capacity.


In 2003, the village made a bold statement: the Kamikatsu Zero Waste Declaration. The main aim of this was to become waste free by 2020, eliminating the use of


twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68