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FEATURE


Although the first version


of the office appeared around the middle of the


Curious about how the dreary place of business from BBC 2’s hit comedy series The Office would have changed over time, HR Director for Printerland, Catherine Bannan asked architectural designer, Maseera Tariq, to redesign the show’s workplace in key eras of office design.


Taylorism Taylorism, also known as Scientific Management, was characterised by a rigid and regimented office layout. Workers were put together in an open environment where bosses could observe them from private offices. As if on a conveyor belt, tasks were split up into small repetitive acts.


Employers were obsessed with gaining maximum productivity from their staff and failed to take into consideration their employees’ human and social needs, and in cases of structural unemployment, little time or money was spared for training and retraining staff.


19th century, it wasn’t until the end of the century that


organisations started to realise


that the way offices are designed has a huge impact on how


workers behave towards one another, their employers and their work.


The Bürolandschaft The Bürolandschaft gained popularity in Germany after the war when people were eager to move away from the ideas of previous generations. It wasn’t just a new look for offices but a whole new way of thinking about working environments, which recognised workers and workplaces as complex and diverse.


Managers were pulled from their offices and put on the main floor, desks were placed in relation to each other according to the flow of paperwork and communication needs of teams, and areas were separated by plants and temporary screens that would give workers some level of privacy.


24 | TOMORROW’S FM twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


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