search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
CLEANING


CASE STUDY: TOWER 42 One of London’s original skyscrapers, Tower 42 is now a hi-tech, multi-occupancy office building that over 70 companies call home. For over ten years DOC have had the privilege of cleaning the entire building from top to bottom, including all the tenanted areas. During that time, the company has worked alongside the Tower 42 management team as part of a One Team approach, designed to ensure that all service providers work together to deliver the highest quality working environment for the building’s occupants.


With a fairly small management team themselves, Tower 42 have come to rely on DOC, who have over 100 staff on site each day, as their ‘eyes and ears’. A good example of this is in waste management, where DOC is responsible for collecting waste from every floor, monitoring occupants’ compliance with recycling via a clear bag system and ensuring that no contaminated waste is loaded into the basement recycling bins and compactors. DOC’s cleaning site manager feeds back to the Tower 42 team on recycling performance (66% at Tower 42 versus 38% for London as a whole), as well as other aspects of building’s health, such as maintenance. It goes without saying that DOC is fully integrated to the building’s CAFM helpdesk and, as the only contractor to have staff visiting every floor, DOC staff also act as the go-to resource for collecting and collating information from different areas of the building or checking out the facts when an incident is reported.


Where does One Team work best? A One Team approach comes into its own when the building is under the stewardship of a roaming FM, visiting site as part of a wider portfolio of buildings. In this situation, a proactive cleaning contractor who has access to all parts of a building can confidently become the FM’s representative on site, acting as the channel for communication between providers and the FM. When faced with this situation at DOC, we have often convened informal meetings with other contractors to discuss concerns and initiatives around issues such as maintenance, waste segregation, tenant complaints, or health and safety.


In a large building, a One Team approach delivers real benefits, but in a slightly different way. It’s not unusual to have your cleaning site manager, who is usually a hands-on, practical personality, again acting as the ‘eyes and ears’ of the FM. Service provider meetings may be chaired by the FM, but cleaning’s position as the omnipresent service can result in it taking on an important new role focusing on the use of mobile app technology, such as RFID tags, camera based quality monitoring systems, or waste recording equipment to generate management information on both service compliance and building usage. All this data can be analysed at a granular level that will usefully inform changes to the way services are delivered within the building.


www.tomorrowsfm.com TOMORROW’S FM | 53


Can cleaning perform this role more often? What’s clear is that by virtue of its central position as an integral service within a building, cleaning and cleaning contractors can play a role in facilities management that goes far beyond creating a hygienic work environment. It just takes a willingness on behalf of all those involved to work out how the very considerable resource that is a cleaning operation can be used to drive superior FM delivery.


www.doccleaning.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68