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WHAT’S NEW? Eric Wright FM Wins


Bilfinger Contract The Eric Wright Group’s facilities management (FM) arm has won a three-year contract to provide property management services to five Bilfinger sites across the country commencing with two in Merseyside.


Eric Wright FM will deliver planned and reactive management and small works to Bilfinger locations in


Solutions for Centralised or


De-centralised Automation Rittal offers customers a range of solutions for the safe packing of sophisticated electronics systems, both centralised and decentralised.


As well as a huge range of enclosures in different sizes, materials and paint specs, employing the company’s sophisticated Eplan software allows engineers to populate the panel in a CAD format, optimising the use of space while enabling changes to be made quickly and easily.


Component size is typically determined by the space needed for terminals, connectors, and clamps, as well as their accessibility for commissioning, servicing, and maintenance. As components get smaller, enclosure packing density is increasing. Furthermore, new functionality such as power management, networking etc, means that additional components are being put in all the time.


Paul Metcalfe, Rittal’s Industrial & Outdoor Enclosures Product Manager commented: “Reducing the size of individual components has not had a noticeable effect on the available space within enclosures, mainly because this is largely determined by the arrangement of the DIN rails, cable ducts and other components. Components are frequently installed in groups and space can only be marginally optimised by individual components.


“We would caution that where space is taken up by smaller components, users should review climate control because higher packing


18 | TOMORROW’S FM


the North West and South, namely Newton-le-Willows and St Helens, with a further three properties being introduced in Chesterfield, Fareham and Reading by the end of 2017.


The contract, worth around over £120k a year, also includes a second phase to deliver cleaning and waste management services at all sites.


Connal O’Brien, Managing Director


of Eric Wright FM, said: “Bilfinger sought a FM company with a proven track record and we’re thrilled to have been chosen as their delivery partner for the next three years.


“Bilfinger join a growing client portfolio and we look forward to working together to expand our geographical reach and service delivery offering.”


www.ericwright.co.uk


densities increase the overall risk of hotspots. The good news is this doesn’t have to be a laborious task because Rittal’s “Therm” application performs the calculation of climate control in its entirety, providing users with appropriate and correctly dimensioned solutions.”


Rittal’s range of enclosures includes models with high IP ratings in sheet steel, stainless steel or plastic, designed to protect the equipment housed in it. This means that, rather than putting the control gear in a separate room, all the control gear can be next to the machine itself.


In other, highly-sensitised environments such as the food industry where hygiene standards


must be met, users now have a choice of both the materials used and the enclosure design, in order to prevent contaminants being deposited and simplify cleaning.


In decentralisation, the focus is around making machines as compact and centralised as possible to make it easy to commission them. Machines can be assembled as complete transportable units, however, the control technology for the machines needs to be in the right place. This can be done either by machine- integrated standard enclosures or through appropriate integration in the body of the machine.


www.rittal.co.uk twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


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