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https://www.thinkwildlife.org/about-crru-uk/ https://www.rentokil.co.uk/?utm_source=PR


“It is critically important that owners and staff know how to spot the signs of rodent activity,


and the steps that can be taken to prevent one from forming.”


Digital pest control


Paul Blackhurst, Head of Rentokil Pest Control’s Technical Academy, details the always- on protection when taking your pest management online.


According to the Chinese zodiac, 2020 celebrates the Year of the Rat. While they are honoured for their spirit and wit in the zodiac, rats can present hygiene issues when they come in contact with people.


Preventing rodent activity must be top of mind for facilities managers, especially those premises involved in food handling in the winter months because of the annual rodent migration indoors. Rats and mice are attracted to buildings where there’s warmth, water and food in abundance. They will often enter buildings through damaged drains or by gnawing through the smallest entry point. Mice can even fit through a hole that’s as small as the width of a biro.


Facilities managers need to be particularly vigilant this winter. Recent Rentokil data suggests the cold and flooding experienced in large parts of the United Kingdom could be responsible for a 20% increase in rodent enquiries from August through to October, compared to the average increase over the past five years during the same period.


With the Campaign for Responsible Rodenticide Use (CRRU) code in effect to encourage businesses to improve sustainability by using non-toxic pest protection methods, a more proactive approach to pest management is a must.


Fighting rodent infestations


Harnessing modern technology, Rentokil’s PestConnect is an innovative digital pest management system, providing 24/7 monitoring, rapid response and effective elimination of rodents. This connected and fully integrated pest control


44 | PEST CONTROL


solution acts like a rodent burglar alarm, providing more insight into rodent activity than ever before.


Connected devices send an alert via SMS immediately when a rodent is detected, so we know exactly where and when a pest has triggered an alarm. A professional technician can then visit the premises to dispose of the pest and address the root cause of the problem.


PestConnect is the ultimate in proactive pest management and limits the use of toxic pesticides. It uses three versions of ‘connected’ traps – ‘AutoGate’ which uses infrared sensors to detect rodents outside the premises, RADAR for those mice that manage to find a way indoors and Rat Riddance Connect, a ‘smart trap’ used to monitor for and control rat activity inside.


The system is completely compliant with the CRRU Code. Its RADAR traps kill rodents using carbon dioxide, a faster and more humane method of elimination, without using rodenticide. Rat Riddance is a connected mechanical trap, and AutoGate is a device with barriers between bait and the environment, which only opens during an active rodent infestation.


Harnessing the latest technological breakthroughs and innovation, digital pest management solutions help facilities managers to manage and prevent infestations while not harming the environment, and with a level of efficiency and visibility not possible without connected solutions. PestConnect also provides an unprecedented level of insight for pest technicians and facilities managers, so they


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