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AT IS ON and installers looking to capitalise on the growing trend for underfloor heating.


FLOORING TO MATCH The best types of flooring to use with underfloor heating is tile and stone since they have high thermal conductivity and retain heat effectively. This means that the heat from an underfloor heating pipe or wire transfers to the floor surface quickly.


However, consideration needs to be given to the thickness of the tile or stone used, as this will affect the length of time it takes for the floor to reach optimum temperature.


Experts at our contract sector, Parkside, recognise that the technical characteristics and performance of a tile are just as important as its aesthetics. This is particularly true in environments that have a high footfall and where the demand and specification of slip resistant tiles is greater. Pendulum Test Values (PTV) are used extensively in the UK for commercial projects and determine the slip resistance of tiles.


The result is that there’s a greater range of commercial-grade tiles available than ever before to match with underfloor heating systems. Although the trend for grey flooring continues, a variety of colours, textures and finishes are available, including plain and pattern tiles in addition to natural and industrial effect tiles.


Underfloor heating is already hugely popular with homeowners, but with the market in the commercial sector growing, installers should make sure they’re not missing out.


www.toppstiles.co.uk/trade twitter.com/TContractFloors UNDERFLOOR HEATING | 37


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