search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
operations managers to verify attendance and eliminates the need for paper timesheets, thereby streamlining payroll reporting. A massive reduction in the administrative burden of paper timesheets can result in substantial savings in payroll processing, including the elimination of time sheet fraud, reduction in payroll overpayments, discrepancies, disputes and time spent on supervision.


“Progression in technology is driving innovation, facilitating a shift for cleaning contractors.”


Exciting IoT (Internet of Things) innovations, from smart watches and other wearable technology to GPS- enabled shoes, will allow the concept of ‘Smart Facilities Management’ to become the standard. FM service providers using this workforce management technology will drive the sector forward by streamlining processes, encouraging higher levels of productivity and boosting long-term profitability. This technology, which sits behind the scenes, can make cleaning businesses win more contracts, make the mundane tasks automated, and the complex issues simple.


providers to manage teams of staff across multiple sites remotely, whilst bringing cost savings and adding to the bottom line.


Smartphone and mobile technology are delivering added value and more and more in-app communication tools are becoming available for mobile workforces to log completed tasks. This means that contract compliance checks can happen in real-time, remotely. Knowledge is power.


Cleaning providers employ large numbers of site-based workers and nowadays they have a need to provide proof of service provision to their own clients. There is a need for attendance verification and actual evidence of time spent at a client’s premises providing contracted services.


The sector is also under increasing pressure to provide accountability for, and safeguarding remote workers. This, coupled with tighter service level agreements, means that ensuring that staff are on-site, as planned, is critical. Modern time and attendance technology enables


Having full, real-time visibility of staff attendance and punctuality is key. Time and attendance data can be captured using either a landline, mobile phone, or another workforce monitoring device. The data is then sent in real time, so Managers can get a clear picture of which staff are where and when, receive immediate alerts for late arrivals, no-shows and early leavers, and act fast to minimise service disruption.


Remote worker technology helps with many health and safety and compliance issues: Working Time Directive compliance, ensuring remote workers are kept safe and evidence that Service Level Agreements (SLAs) are being met.


An integrated Workforce Management System will include scheduling, payroll and invoice reporting so that employees can be allocated, pay rates assigned and payroll extracts can be produced. Seamless integration to existing rostering and payroll systems means that tailored reports can be created quickly and easily. The technology significantly reduces potential for fraud and timekeeping disputes as it enables payroll managers to compare actual hours worked against planned hours, therefore significantly reducing the chance of over-payments.


The team at Ezitracker will be on hand at the Manchester Cleaning Show (Stand A11) to demonstrate the value of the solution.


www.ezitracker.com


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


FEATURE | 37


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102