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Stereoscopic Effects


Figure 4 : Globular shell of a radiolarian (diameter = 125 µm). An example of red-cyan anaglyphs of microfossils photographed with the SEM.


Figure 3 : Red-cyan anaglyphs of single-electron micrographs reconstructed by object-depth mapping. (Top) Front view of a jumping spider ( Salticus sp.) with typical position of the eyes and arrangement of the claws. Image width = 4.5 mm. (Bottom) detailed view on the sensory hairs and lyriform organs of a tarantula. Image width = 250 µm. (Original image: https://vogelspinnenforum. ch/index.php/Thread/9436-Bilder-ganz-nah-REM .)


Morphological studies of sub-millimeter-sized crystals represent another area where the SEM excels. Figure 5 shows the single crystal facets of a zircon crystal. In the case of such small polyhedral objects, modeled viewing angles between the two semi-images should be on the order of 3 to 5°.


Conclusion


Over many decades 3D photography has become a standard technique for the detailed documentation of macroscopic and microscopic objects. Whereas most stereo documentation has been accomplished by taking two images at different angles to the object, 3D imaging has been achieved recently from single images with the help of appropriate computer software. Thus, even SEM micrographs with large depth of field produced in the 1970s or 1980s can be converted into 3D images.


2018 July • www.microscopy-today.com


Figure 5 : Zircon crystal with slightly moderated faces (length = 150 µm). An example of 3D imaging in mineralogy.


References [1] JI Goldstein et al ., Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis , Springer , New York , 2003 .


[2] R Sturm , Mikrokosmos 97 ( 2 ) ( 2008 ) 75 – 80 . [3] R Sturm , Deposits Magazine 18 ( 2009 ) 10 – 13 . [4] R Sturm , Mikrokosmos 98 ( 6 ) ( 2009 ) 331 – 36 . [5] R Sturm , Deposits Magaz ine 26 ( 2011 ) 12 – 15 . [6] R Sturm , Mikroskopie 3 ( 2 ) ( 2016 ) 86 – 100 . [7] R Sturm , Biologie in unserer Zeit 45 ( 1 ) ( 2015 ) 52 – 55 . [8] R Sturm , Naturwissenschaſt liche Rundschau 70 ( 4 ) ( 2017 ) 500 – 06 .


[9] E Raap and H Cypionka , Mikrokosmos 100 ( 3 ) ( 2011 ) 140 – 44 .


[10] R Sturm , Microscopy Today 25 ( 4 ) ( 2017 ) 46 – 49 . 37


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