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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 32 YEARS


COCKERMOUTH HERITAGE GROUP NEWS 01900 823966 • cockermouthheritagegroup@outlook.com • www.cockermouthheritagegroup.org.uk


We all know the saying: “Nothing stays the same” and of course in recent months, a major town centre change is underway on Station Road.


The area where the former West Cumberland Farmers, the builder’s merchants and the adjacent garage once stood, can now be seen to be surprisingly large. Let us look at the history of that piece of land.


When the railway was extended in 1866 and Station Street and Road were created, it caused considerable changes to the previous road layout. Prior to that, Kittyson Lane (now curtailed by Sainsbury’s and Station Road) led from South Street (Back Lane) out towards the Egremont Road. The


was


area we now know mainly


field common.


Left is view from Harris Park in the 1880s


and late


As seen in photo- graphs of the 1880s 1890s,


the


fields are empty down as far as the corner of Lorton


Road. The old cinema was built in 1914 and the present adjacent single storey building was originally


West Cumberland Farmers, Station Road ca. 1968


The West Cumberland Farmers Trading Society Ltd. was the first building on the field above New Road. “The society was started early in the 20th century


Ellwood’s Garage, Station Road ca. 1968


In the late 1960s, the upper end of the field was developed by Messrs. J. V. Ellwood & Sons as a garage and filling station, their former premises at 35, Market Place being no longer suitable (the petrol pump was by the pavement).


Share your memories with us. Josephine Brown


The Club was recently treated to an interesting illustrated talk, given by Phil Wilson on Zeppelins’. He began his talk by explaining that his interest in airships began after a visit to the Zeppelin museum which houses models of these aircraft.


COCKERMOUTH PROBUS CLUB ~ SHIPS OF THE AIR ~


USA.


LIZ HUNTER PHYSIOTHERAPY LTD


We have a team of five physiotherapists and a sports and remedial massage therapist offering appointments Monday to Saturday including some evenings. We also offer a wide range of follow on exercise classes to maintain and improve strength and flexibility, these are in small groups to suit all abilities and ages. We can help with all joint and muscular issues with your individual needs as priority. For an appointment please contact us on 01900 822008 Lorton Street Clinic, Lorton Street, Cockermouth, CA13 9RH


INFO@COCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


These airships were first developed before the first flight of a powered plane by the Wright brothers. An engineer, Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin pioneered the design of these rigid airships, after observing the value of balloons in the American Civil War, mainly for artillery spotting. He first formulated his ideas in 1874 and refined them up to 1899. Realising that balloons were under the control of prevailing winds, he designed long vessels with rigid frames, packed with individual bags of hydrogen, which is the element of lowest density. Von Zeppelin saw the value of these aircraft for passenger transport and postal services. His design was an outstanding success, so much so, that all rigid airships were called Zeppelins.


Phil went on to explain how Zeppelin developed and modified his design, assisted by other engineers, resulting in commercial flights in 1910. Using diagrams and photographs, Phil


The group were then informed of the role that airships played in WWI and the devastation they caused. On an interesting note, he explained how standard bullets used by fighter planes were not so effective in destroying enemy craft, so they reverted to a combination of incendiary and explosive ammunition.


The talk was concluded with a discussion of the demise of these vessels of the sky, mainly due to accidents involving the highly combustible and explosive hydrogen, heralded by the Hindenburg disaster in 1937.


Alan Whitely gave a hearty vote of thanks for a well-received talk.


If anyone is interested in joining Cockermouth Probus, please email cockermouthprobusclub@gmail.com


Mike Rooney and Harris Park in the 1890s an egg-packing station of the 1940s.


Cattle pens shown in the field, were used as overnight resting for those cattle brought in by train.


by a group of farmers joining together to buy feeding stuffs in bulk. The first branch was opened in Cockermouth in 1922. By 1932, the Society had 9 branches.” J.B. Bradbury.


Plans for the building now demolished were approved in 1938, then later improvements were made, including an extension for offices and showroom applied for in 1972.


described how propulsion systems and navigational control became more sophisticated. The illustrations also showed how luxurious these vessels were, regularly carrying passengers from Europe to the


ISSUE 434 | 22 AUGUST 2019 | 18


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