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PROJECT REPORT: SELFBUILD & CUSTOM BUILD PROJECTS


39


off-the-shelf roof trusses and having them extend to these areas to construct the building’s superstructure the design produced significant cost savings of around £20,000- 30,000, and reduced construction time considerably.


Integra House took nine months in total to build; three months longer than anticipated because there was no main contractor. Instead, a separate contractor was used for the groundworks, another for the joinery, and Deveci got hands-on, doing the plumbing and electricity himself. “Workmanship was difficult, and a bit more time-intensive,” Deveci admits. In addition to specifying budgetary constraints, the client was, says Deveci, “very involved.” Weekly meetings were arranged over coffee to which “she would always bring a magazine and try to hint that there were certain aspects that she liked and didn’t like.” The architect compiled a wish-list of features which included a wood-burning stove and far-reaching views from the kitchen and living area over the Aberdeenshire countryside.


In order to retain the monolithic aesthetic of the building provided by the timber cladding, Deveci also specified a drainage system whereby rainwater flows through the timber cladding on the roof via thin slits, down a corrugated iron roof beneath and


ADF JUNE 2019


into a hidden gutter. “I didn’t want a plastic or metal gutter; it would have been a much less elegant solution.”


There were already agricultural sheds and stables around the site, and the ageing of the materials plus the shape of the plan make the house look “almost agricultural in nature,” says Deveci, “particularly to the north of the scheme, where there are very few openings in the house’s external envelope.” In terms of acoustics, Integra House is well-suited to the building’s intended function. “My client is single – if there were others in the house then there may have been some challenges.” According to the architect, the double height spaces tend to create some constraints when it comes to acoustic performance: “It’s best to have some kind of mass in an all timber-framed house.” The internal organisation of the building was impacted by the gable ends in that first floor space was particularly tight due to truss wind load calculations, and there was also a need to be conscious of the direction of the stairs leading up to the attic space, which had to run parallel to the trusses.


Green on green


The truss is made from standard structural grade soft wood, the external cladding is 45 mm thick Siberian larch “which does not require external treatment,” and the insulation is partly wood fibre. which


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TIMBER


The building’s entire structure and insulation is composed of timber


Using off-the-shelf roof trusses and extending them to construct the building’s superstructure produced significant cost savings


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