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he new Community Hub designed by BDP and built at the interface between a challenged housing estate in Bath and a new housing development, is a shining example of how an enlightened client can maximise community capital, with the help of a like-minded architect. Housing association Curo is managing an ongoing regeneration project for the Foxhill estate, just to the south of the city centre, but far from the wealthy Georgian splendour Bath is famous for. As well as refurbishing houses it owns across the site by 2024, Curo is also building 700 homes at Combe Down next door. The development is on the former MOD Foxhill


T ADF JUNE 2019


site where the Admiralty designed the floating Mulberry Harbours used at D-Day, with the site being somewhat cut off from the city due to its historic role.


The housing association fully engaged the community, consulting them on what they would want from the refurbishments, the housing scheme masterplanned by HTA, and the new community hub, which included a new primary academy. The scheme’s name was a result of this consultation process – a resident suggested calling it Mulberry Park in order to reflect the site’s history.


Project director at BDP Nick Fairham tells ADF: “We’ve never worked on a


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