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District Winery photo courtesy: washington.org


What’sNew As of August 2018, there are 4,544 rooms in 20


hotels in the pipeline. Here are some recently opened and upcoming properties:


Anchored by the conversion of a 110-year-old neoclassical church, The Line DC is a multi-story build in Adams Morgan that opened January 2018. The art-filled hotel from the Sydell Group adds 220 rooms to this eclectic neighborhood. In-house dining options include Spoken English and Brothers and Sisters from Erik Bruner-Yang, and A Rake’s Progress and A Rake’s Bar by Spike Gjerde.


The former Four Points Sheraton was recently transformed into a 209-room lifestyle property called Eaton Workshop, which opens this September. In addition to a bar and restaurant from Derek Brown (The Columbia Room) and Tim Ma (Kyirisan) respectively, the flagship property sports amenities designed to charm millennial travelers: a radio/podcasting studio; a 50-person movie theater; a co-working space for 370 mem- bers and a juice bar and wellness center offering alternative treatments.


Hilton Washington DC National Mall, a renovated rebranded property is opening at L’Enfant Plaza with 367 rooms. The location is key: the property is equidistant to the National Mall and The Wharf and faces the future home of the International Spy Museum. The property is topped by a heated swimming pool and features 23,000-square feet of meeting space.


DC’s first Moxy Hotel, a budget-minded, millenni- al-forward 200-room property with small rooms and shared public spaces, is under development and scheduled to open later this year.


Washington, DC’s professional soccer team, DC United, now has a new $300 million state-of-the art stadium, Audi Field, located at Buzzard Point in Southwest. The venue seats 20,000 and include 31 luxury suites, a bike valet, and 500,000-square feet of mixed-use retail and event space.


The Walter E. Washington Convention Center will begin a fresh renovation this fall. Capital improvements include new seating, enhanced digital signage, additional retail, a streetscape plan and a “mamava pod” for nursing mothers.


Food&Drink Washington, DC’s first winery, District Winery, is a new 17,000-square foot venue in


Capitol Riverfront overlooking the Anacostia River that brings various options for private events, seated dinners and cocktail parties.


There are plenty of new places to eat and drink near the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. From Top Chef star Marjorie Meek-Bradley’s sandwich shop, Smoked & Stacked, to another Top Chef alum, Spike Mendelsohn’s Morris American Bar, visitors can enjoy everything from delicious eats to unique cocktails in proximity to the conven- tion center.


For locally sourced snacks and on-the-go items, guests can check out Union Kitchen Grocery. Or, grab a table at Unconventional Diner, a high-end diner concept specializing in modern comfort food.


We think small meetings are a big deal.


acious aartment-like suites ree Wi-i and continental breakast and newl renoated meeting acilities. ll in the heart o eorgetown.


A hotel that acts like something better www.georgetownsuites.com 800-348-7203 Mid-Atlantic­EvEntS Magazine 79


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