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10 • July 2018 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC. Self-Sustaining Ecosystems by Kimberly Childers • kimberlychilders@att.net moment. I


t’s heating up in the garden this month! Wear your wide brimmed hats and hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Little ice cubes with frozen lemon


wedges or squeezes of tangerine, cucumber, borage flowers all really great to add to your water and to- tally refresh- ing. Orange cantaloupes, juicy red to- matoes, pink and yellow watermelon and fresh ev- erything is an absolute delight to eat this month. Picnics and road trips, whale watch- ing, splash- ing


in wild


creeks and ponds, visiting relatives and friends is filling up the summer months so enjoy every priceless


Just out Brilliant and Wild, a Garden from Scratch in a Year, by Lucy Bellamy is a must have. She is the new editor of the fabulous Gardens Illustrat- ed magazine. Her beautiful book is filled with stun- ning illus- trations by celebrated photogra- pher Jason Ingram.


So perfect for anyone just


start-


ing out, a great gift and


cer-


tainly an addition to


Art watercolor by Kimberly Childers


your gardening library. She offers step-by-step illustra- tions so you are guided through the entire process to achieve your own ‘wild’ masterpiece. Very detailed,


tailed illustrations, descriptions and what goes well with what, wildlife benefits, why grow it, grasses, col- orful map ideas for simple layout and combinations, flower calendar


she shows different styles of creat- ing divine meadows with the aid of plant lists, why it works and de-


and so much more! You won’t want to put this delightful compen- dium down. You’ll probably head out to the gar- den your head brimming with ideas making your own lists of plants you’ll soon be laying out in the cho- sen sites. Gasp! Think about fun


terrariums,


to create and a great little sum- mer project when it’s too hot to venture out- side in the heat. Also called Fern Cases or Ward- ian Cases named after doctor and botanist Nathan-


iel Bagshaw Ward in 1827. When he was studying moths and cater- pillars, noticed a little fern growing in the bottom of the jar. Ward re- alized that growing sensitive ferns in glass jars would keep them away from the detrimental fumes of fac- tory pollution in London. Started in Victorian times when people col- lected ferns it developed into quite an art, different sizes of ornamen- tal glass jars, unusual collections of tiny exotic plants and more. Nearly self-sustaining ecosys- only need very Pick


tems, terrariums light misting occasionally.


up a big apothecary jar or other ap- pealing glass jar, something from a cool antique store or yard sale,


... continued on page 29


This Is Probably Not A Good Time To Start Thinking About A Will!


JOKES & Humor # 3


What’s the best place to keep orphan chickens?


Foster Farms ~


JOKES FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES: BEAR WITH US!


Q. What did the left hand say to the right hand?


A. How does it feel to always be right? ~


Q. What’s the difference between a guitar and a fish? A. You can’t tuna fish. ~


Q. What’s black and white and eats like a horse. A. A Zebra. ~


Q. What do you comb a rabbit with?


A. A hare brush. ~


Q. What do you call a pan spinning through space? A. An unidentified frying object.


Are you interested in a free consultation about ways to protect your property now?


WILLS & TRUSTS


Michael C. Fallon Jr. ~ fallonmc@fallonlaw.net 707-546-6770


10 • July 2018 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC. Beauty to me is being comfortable in your own skin.~ Gwyneth Paltrow


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