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Corsica Porto Torres


hon


Sardinia Portovesme


Civitavecchia


Santa Teresa Golfo Aranci Olbia


Oristano


Ortona Naples Castellammare di Stabia Salerno Cagliari Palermo Milazzo Bizerte La Goulette Tunis Sousse Tunisia Trapani Porto Empedocle


Termini Imerese


Sicily Valletta Malta C


TUNISIAN PORTS


Must see tourist attractions


• Tunis city (modern) shops, etc. • Tunis city (ancient) Medina, etc. • Mosque of the Olive Tree, Medina • 20km of beaches/watersports, etc. • Bardo Museum (largest collection of Roman mosaics)


Tunis, near to the port of La Goulette, is a city where yesterday and today blend together - a bustling Mediterranean city of palm tree boulevards, modern buildings, bright yellow taxis and chic boutiques alongside the narrow streets of the ancient Medina or Suuq, awash with leather and coloured garments. Follow the shops offering antiques, jewellery, carpets and pottery towards the Mosque of the Olive Tree, Ez Zitouna at the heart of the Medina. This is Tunis' main mosque and is named after the mosque's founder who taught the Koran under an olive tree. Built in the 9th Century, the minaret was added in the 19th Century. It is today a house of learning. Existing berths of La Goulette, with a total of 657mtr, together they reach a total length of around 1,700mtr. The facilities include a new tourist village (Goulette Village Harbour) and have increased the port's handling facilities as well as speed up transfer times, and most


importantly enhanced security operations, with the entire area fully ISPS compliant. Covering an area of 6,500sq mtr, the Goulette Village Harbour resembles a medina with Tunisian architectural styling and comprises a central building with two wings alongside housing 10 shops selling local traditional clothing, watches and jewellery. There are an a la carte fish restaurant, cafes and juice bar plus hammam, health and beauty shops. Nearby Tunis is the Bardo Museum which boasts the largest collection of Roman mosaics in the world. The museum also displays objects ranging from pre-historic artefacts to modern jewellery. Services: No policy check if you stay inside the village, a fleet of 350 village taxis with a posted price list, Postal service and banking service. The ports of Sousse and Bizerte are also part of the Tunisian Port membership. Free internet is available at Goulette village.


Maximum ship dimensions for berth Length: 330mtr Width: 30mtr Draught: 9mtr


Anchorage Available: yes Ship tenders allowed: yes Tugs available: yes Tidal movement/range: max 0.4mtr


Quays Total number of quays: 8 Total length of quays: 1,700mtr Quay depth: 9mtr Passenger terminals: yes


Distances/Transportation City centre: 10km Airport: 7km Free shuttle service to city: yes


Traffic Total cruise passengers 2017: 5,317 Total cruise calls 2017: 6 Turnaround port? no


Mailing Address


Office de la Marine Marchande et des Ports Batiment Administratif 2060 La Goulette, Tunis Tunisia


E ommp@ommp.nat.tn Wwww.ommp.nat.tn


74


Other Contact Mr Sami Battikh CEO


Mr Mohamed Omrane Director Port La Goulette


Main Contact


Cherifa Ben Salem Director Foreign Relations E c.bensalem@ommp.nat.tn P +216 71 738 383 F +216 71 738 383 M +216 98 379 753


PORT FACTS


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