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to avoid further injury, especially individuals that had a torn Achilles tendon. “Stretching is important when doing any exercise, and especially important following surgery or injury, because the body’s reaction to either one is to contract, which can cause secondary problems,” explains Whelan. “I think the body has an intelligence we must listen to. We must


acknowledge our limitations and the signals our body sends us to let us know that something is harmful or painful,” she notes. “When you take responsibility to take care of your body, it will take care of you.” For injury prevention, dynamic stretching offers many bene-


fits. “It’s the best because it ensures that all major joints have full range of motion and sufficient muscle length,” says Wegman. She advises never to stretch an injured muscle or stretch too forcefully.


“Introduce low-intensity stretching back into a regime only under a doctor’s supervision,” she cautions.


Daily Moderation For Chabut, moderation is everything. “Gently warm up the body before moving into deeper stretches. Build heat in the muscles slowly to avoid potential injury,” she advises. Proper stretching is beneficial, but not doing so can foster bad


habits and cause muscle or tendon tears. “Stretching cold muscles or using improper techniques such as bouncing when holding a stretch position are common mistakes,” observes Whelan. Stretching doesn’t have to be reserved for workouts, and with


a little discipline, its benefits can easily be attained at home or the office. “Take 10 minutes during your favorite TV program and perform a couple of stretches,” suggests Wegman. “Make it a point to get up every half-hour and stretch for five minutes before resuming work. If you aren’t being pushed or pushing yourself, you won’t see results or make improvements. If it doesn’t chal- lenge you, it doesn’t change you.”


Marlaina Donato is a freelance writer, author and multimedia artist. Connect at MarlainaDonato.com.


STRETCHING GUIDE AT A GLANCE


STATIC What it is: Hold a stretch in a chal- lenging, but not painful position, for 10 to 30 seconds until feeling discomfort; once this is felt, the muscle then releases and relaxes.


Benefit: Improves flexibility.


ACTIVE (aka Static Active) What it is: Engage and contract the muscle group opposite the one being stretched to initiate the stretch; repeat. Many yoga poses are exam- ples of active stretching.


Benefit: Increases flexibility in the muscles being stretched and increases strength in the opposing muscles.


PASSIVE What it is: Employ an outside force such as a stretching device, strap or another’s body weight such as a trainer, physical therapist or massage therapist, which assists the stretch while the individual remains pas- sive. The targeted muscles are not actively engaged. Examples include post-workout stretches applying pressure with a body part, towel or other prop or piece of equipment.


Benefit: Increases range of motion, decreases muscle tension (spasm) and reduces post-workout soreness and fatigue.


DYNAMIC What it is: Use controlled, gradual movements and stretches that involve repeated range of motion moves, especially in relation to a specific activity or sport that will follow the warm-up.


Benefit: Prepares the body for activ- ity and warms the muscles; especially advantageous after static stretches. Builds strength.


Primary sources: Fitness Science; Scott White, a power trainer in Scottsdale, AZ.


HELPFUL RESOURCES BOOKS


n Dynamic Stretching: The Revolutionary New Warm-Up Method to Improve Power, Performance and Range of Motion, by Mark Kovacs


n Dynamic Stretching vs. Static Stretching and Their Benefits, by Jack Cascio


n Exercise Balls for Dummies (including safe stretches for pregnant woman) and Stretching for Dummies, both by LeReine Chabut


n Stretching: 20 Simple Stretching Techniques to Relieve Pain and Increase Flexibility, by Neb Notliar


ONLINE VIDEOS


n BlackBeltWiki.com/stretching (range of stretches specific to martial arts styles and body parts)


n DoYogaWithMe.com/yoga-beginners (free yoga videos for all levels)


n ElderGym.com/elderly-flexibility (highly detailed instruction tailored to seniors)


n Essentrics.com/media.html (videos from the PBS series Classical Stretch)


n StretchCoach.com/resources/stretching-videos (instruction specific to sports and muscle groups)


n StudioSweatOnDemand.com/classes/feature/ good-for-beginners (select stretching videos)


natural awakenings November 2017 53


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