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globalbriefs


Window Pain Birds Die Flying Into Reflective Glass


Pedestrian Power


Smart Street Lights Powered by Footsteps


Conventional street lights collec- tively emit more than 100 million tons of carbon dioxide annually. The city of Las Vegas, a leader in municipal sustainability, has con- tracted with EnGoPlanet, a New York City clean tech startup, to install the world’s first Smart Street Lights powered by pedestrians’ footsteps via kinetic energy pads and solar energy. When someone steps on a kinetic tile, energy is created and goes directly to a battery. Petar Mirovic, CEO of EnGo-


Planet, says, “Clean and free energy is all around us. Urban cities have to build the smart infrastructures of tomorrow that will be able to harvest all of that energy. This project is a small but important step in that direction.” Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G.


Goodman says, “Through our LEED-certified buildings, solar projects, water reclamation, alternative-fueled vehicles and sustainable streetlights, Las Vegas continues to lead the way.” The company also cites Smart


Street Light projects in Chicago, Detroit, Auburn Hills (Michigan), Asbury Park (New Jersey) and at stadiums such as the Mer- cedes-Benz Superdome, in New Orleans.


View an illustrative video at Tinyurl.com/SmartStreetLights.


10 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


One night earlier this year, nearly 400 birds migrating north from Central and South America died in the midst of a storm from slamming into the 23-story American National Insurance Company skyscraper in Galveston, Texas. Among the victims were Nashville warblers, yellow warblers and ovenbirds. The American Bird Conservancy


estimates as many as 1 billion birds die annually from colliding with glass in the U.S. as they see and therefore fly into the reflection of landscapes and the sky or inside vegetation. The exterior of the Galveston build-


ing, previously lit by large floodlights, is now illuminated only by green lights on its top level for air travel safety considerations. Other widely avail- able means to protect birds include products to make residential and


commercial windows less attractive to them. Specially placed tape or mullions creating stripes or patterns can help birds identify glass and avoid deadly crashes. Awnings, shutters and outside screens can also reduce bird collisions with buildings.


Now, Get the Sleep You’ve Always Dreamed About


Why Buy Your Natural organic mattress from Green Dream Beds?


In business since 2006, we are the Triangle’s first organic mattress dealer, and have hundreds of satisfied customers. We sell only the best natural organic mattresses and bedding prod- ucts. We offer:


VARIETY: We have the full range of Savvy Rest, Naturepedic and Eco Bedroom Solutions products.


ChoiCe: We have many floor models for you to try, and we can custom configure any variation.


SAFETY: Our environmentally-friendly products are free of hazardous and toxic materials. Comfort: Our natural materials and unique designs provide you with a great night’s sleep.


ServiCe: We make house calls for initial set up, adjustments, exchanges, or warranty claims.


3401 University Drive • Durham NC 27707 919-321-1284 • greendreambeds@gmail.com www.greendreambeds.com


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Marijus Auruskevicius/Shutterstock.com


martin33/Shutterstock.com


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