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FEATURE SPONSOR


SPOTLIGHT ON WESTERN FRANCE


Oceanic energy producers need to catch up. And fast, before the opportunity to play a major role in the future of European renewable energy is lost forever. The only way they can do this is by innovating – improving their technology to reduce their competitive cost.


TURNING IDEAS INTO COMMERCIAL REALITY Of course, this isn’t easy. But organisations like InnoEnergy exist to help sustainable energy and cleantech innovators quickly turn their ideas into commercial reality. InnoEnergy has provided a number of offshore businesses with not only funding but


professional advice, mentorship and access to its network of more than 300 partners.


It’s this support that has helped Principle Power bring its Windfloat floating offshore wind platforms to commercialisation. And InnoEnergy has recently invested in Deep Green, Minesto’s award-winning tidal power plant technology, as well as in Corpower’s wave energy buoy.


SUPPORTING SUCCESS STORIES All that remains is for European nations, including France, to ensure the commercial infrastructure is ready to support such success stories. They


must provide the legal and investment framework necessary to encourage innovation and shorten the route to market for oceanic energy firms so they can compete with the wider world of renewable producers.


Only then will we see the sustainable energy sector adapt like the famous abbey. But instead of evolving to cope with the tides, Europe can take advantage of them.


Javier Sanz


Renewable Energies Thematic Leader InnoEnergy


WEBSITE


BUSINESS BOOSTER


www.wavetidalenergynetwork.co.uk


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