search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
67 Garden design New House, New Garden


by Colette Charsley


Now what? Moving garden is a two-part process.


• What, if any, plants do you ‘simply have to take’ from your old garden?


• What on earth are you going to do with your new garden?


For some reason, most gardeners experience a huge and irrational urge to take their old garden with them to their new one. There are obvious legal and moral implications of denuding your carefully tended and loved plot. If you really must take some plants with you let your purchasers know first. Then think about where they might actually fit into your new garden. The condition of the soil, light and many other environmental factors are likely to be different. Will the plants thrive? Is there even room for them? Are you going to mess up a perfectly good plant- ing scheme for no obvious reason? Is the season even correct for moving plants or taking cuttings? You will have quite enough to manage without tending to a random collection of pots containing shocked plants. Wasn’t the existing garden part of the attraction of buying your new home in the first place? Just remember you can always buy new plants.


How not to do it!


Is it worth it?


MoVinG HoUSe iS one oF THe MoST STReSSFUL THinGS YoU CAn Do. So AnYTHinG YoU CAn Do To KeeP CALM HAS To Be A GooD iDeA.


Once you have finally got to your new house you may feel that you want to start making your mark on your garden. My advice to all clients in this situation is – Don’t Do Anything. You have time on your side. Identify as many of the plants as you can. Watch any spring bulbs emerge. Have a good hunt round to see if there is any bindweed or ground elder. Get to know your soil. Find the different microclimates – there will be hot spots and possibly frost pockets. Discover where you want to sit and then decide if the terraces are in the right place and are the right size for you. Make plans and think carefully before you launch into any costly work. While you are acquainting yourself just carry out basic maintenance to stop everything turning into a jungle. Then, and only then, can you start to plan what, if any changes to the hard structure or planting are needed. You will probably be glad of the rest anyway, so enjoy it.


Just remember


you can always buy new plants.


colette@charsleydesign.com www.charsleydesign.com t: 01803 722449 m: 07774 827799 Follow me on Twitter @ColetteCharsley


Professional Landscape and Garden Design


Creative and beautiful designs for village, town and country gardens


Colette Charsley PG Dip OCGD 01803 722449 07774 827799


colette@charsleydesign.com www.charsleydesign.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80