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61 Laying Up Your Boat


ALL TOO SOON WE HAVE REACHED THE END OF THE SEASON. CHRIS ROBINSON AT DARTMOUTH CHANDLERY LOOKS AT A FEW OF THEIR LATEST PRODUCTS TO HELP LAY-UP DURING THE WINTER


ALL NEW SMART DRY DEHUMIDIFIER Good ventilation is essential unless you have a dehumidifier to keep the boat dry and prevent mildew and mould forming. Seago have just launched their all new Smart Dry dehumidifier which is the perfect tool for keeping your boat dry this winter. The Smart Dry has a sleek modern look in a compact design with all the right features; it has a 1.8 litre tank and a continuous drain option with the hose supplied. The digital display makes it easy to see what the humidity settings are and what the unit is set to. The Smart Dry will automatically turn off when the humidity level is below your desired setting, in the event of a power cut the unit will no longer be working until the power is restored. Once the power is restored the Smart Dry will come back on with all of the previous settings allowing you to leave the Smart Dry running with confidence.


MARINE DIESEL BASICS Half an hour spent on the engine can save you from potentially crippling repair bills but how many of us are competent engineers? This new book makes things much clearer. ‘Marine Diesel Basics’ is a new series of VISUAL guides to the complete marine diesel system on sailboats, powerboats and narrow boats. With over 300 illustrations, this book explains everything you need to know to maintain a marine diesel system, winterise the diesel system, protect from heat and humidity and ensure reliable and trouble-free service. • Step-by-step instructions in clear, simple drawings. • Explanation of the complete system - fuel, lubrication, cooling, breathing, electrical, running gear (shaft, stuffing box, propeller). • List of all necessary tools and supplies to get each task done . • It covers sailboats, motorboats and narrow boats. • Indirect and direct cooled diesel engines • Sail drives - maintenance, lay-up and recommission Maximise the joy and freedom of being out on the water knowing your diesel system is properly maintained and a reliable and robust friend in all conditions. Marine Diesel Basics shows you how.


Odourlos – Toilet Fresh Heads & bilges are the cause of most bad


smells in the boat. Drain down and wash the heads and holding tank with ‘Toilet Fresh’ and wash out and treat the holding tank with ‘Odourlos’ to keep nice and fresh and prevent freezing during winter. No need to drain the water tanks either as we sell ‘Freeze Ban’ non-toxic antifreeze for drinking water


MARINE 16 DIESEL BUG TREATMENT


Top up the fuel tank as full as possible to prevent condensation and dose with fuel treatment additive to keep bug growth away.


Diesel Bug Treatment is exactly what the product says. Marine16 diesel bug treatment is a biocide blend formulated especially for preventing or eradicating the fuel spoilage organisms known


collectively as diesel bug. A 100ml bottle is sufficient to prevent diesel bug growth in 2000 litres of fuel. For serious contamination additional rates of 100ml to 100 litres may be required. For severe contamination, several doses may be required to break up and remove the biological sludge that forms. This diesel bug treatment disperses into both the water and fuel phases in your tank and will remain sufficiently active for over a year at both high and low temperatures. Marine 16’s Diesel Bug Treatment is the fuel treatment of choice for the RNLI, the Royal Marines, Sea Start and River Canal Rescue as well as being number 1 in the Practical Boat Owner magazine review.


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