search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INDUSTRY NEWS 5


Picture courtesy of Natalie Oxford


Grenfell Tower blaze leaves at least 80 dead


Police believe the fire at Grenfell Tower in west London has resulted in an estimated 80 deaths, though many believe the final toll which is reportedly unlikely to surface this year will exceed that figure. The 24-storey block, refurbished in 2016,


suffered severe damage in the fire on 14 June which rapidly spread through many of the 120 flats. Eyewitnesses reported many residents trapped in their homes. Grenfell Tower, which is part of Lancaster West Estate built in 1974 by Kensington and Chelsea Borough Council, was part of a borough-wide regeneration project and was re-clad last year, with


Rydon as main contractor. The two-year, £10m refurbishment was managed by Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation (KCTMO) on behalf of the council. A communal heating system was installed in addition to rain screen cladding, replacement windows and curtain wall facades.


The BBC reported that the local Grenfell Action Group had claimed, before and during the refurbishment that the block constituted a fire risk, and residents had warned that access to the site for emergency vehicles was “severely restricted”.


CLADDING CHECKS Local authorities and housing associations across England have been asked to carry out urgent safety checks on their buildings’ cladding. The Government has revealed that a


total of 120 tower blocks have failed fire safety tests on cladding, following Grenfell. Speaking during Prime Minister’s


Questions following the fire, the PM iterated that she believed the cladding used for Grenfell Tower fell short of Building Regulations. She said that 100 per cent of the cladding samples tested by the BRE were found to contain combustible material. In the aftermath of the fire, Melanie


Dawes, permanent secretary at DCLG (Department of Communities and Local Government), wrote to social housing providers asking them to identify if “any panels used in new build or refurbishment


“IT IS IMPORTANT THAT THE BEST EXPERTISE FROM ACROSS OUR INDUSTRY, THE RESEARCH COMMUNITIES, THE PROFESSIONS AND THE PUBLIC SECTOR IS DRAWN OUT


TO SUPPORT THE GOVERNMENT AND SOCIETY AT THIS CRITICAL TIME OF NEED” Dr Peter Bonfield, chief executive of the Building Research Establishment


WWW.HBDONLINE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52