search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
WATER & DAMP PROOFING 47


hen asked in what type of house you would usually find a basement, the average person would think of a multi-storey property, probably terraced, and built in the Victorian era, perhaps slightly later.


W


The picture many have in their minds when it comes to basements is a damp area, illuminated by a solitary light bulb. Because of this, basements are often considered a relic from times gone by, a dank place where a rickety old boiler rattles away in an effort to keep to the house warm, or where all those old photographs are kept – the dumping ground for worn-out cardboard boxes.


While many perceive basements as serving little or no use, there is a strong argument to include basement areas on new-build developments, the most prominent being the ability to increase usable living space.


Land that might once have been ignored, seen as unsuitable for construction, is now ‘in the frame’. With developers currently pushing through as many properties as possible onto a plot, the negative effect of smaller and more compact housing is being seen across the country, and is particularly acute in London.


In situations such as these, creating extra space without a detrimental effect on the ecology of a dwelling will always be be of benefit to the homeowner. In larger, more exclusive sites, a basement can be the ideal place for a ‘granny annex’, wine cellar, gymnasium, home cinema, or play area for kids and grown-ups alike. When it comes to construction, instinctively the thought process is to ensure moisture from the outside is prevented from ingressing into the building, but that need not be the case. The most common solution for below ground construction would be tanking, the application of a layer of cementitious waterproof render on the walls, likened to a waterproof screed on the floor. This can also be achieved by using a sheet membrane, asphalt or other liquid-applied waterproofing material. Hydrostatic pressure, the external water pressure around the basement, is another critical factor. It is crucial that the tanking be securely fixed to the substrate, as the pressure from the water table around the basement can be significant. Hydrostatic pressure will force water through tiny gaps very quickly, so great care should be taken at this stage to ensure that the waterproofing meets the demands made of it.


Many argue that rather than doing your utmost to prevent water entering the building, with a real possibility of failure, it would be more beneficial to deal with the water once it has entered the building. This


ON ANOTHER LEVEL


Brian Davison of Delta Membrane Systems delves into the benefits of including a basement in a property, and advises on how to prevent water damage.


MANY ARGUE THAT RATHER THAN DOING YOUR UTMOST TO PREVENT WATER ENTERING THE BUILDING, WITH A REAL POSSIBILITY OF FAILURE, IT WOULD BE MORE BENEFICIAL TO DEAL WITH THE WATER ONCE IT HAS ENTERED THE BUILDING


WWW.HBDONLINE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52