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Reid Oyster Executive Vice President | Apple Bus Company | Kansas City


Reid Oyster’s first foray into the student


transportation industry was his summer job as a 15-year-old high school student when he worked in a school bus maintenance shop. Now, 36, he’s executive vice president for Missouri-based school bus contractor Apple Bus Company. He pinpoints three indispensable characteristics that he uses in daily leadership: Vision, discipline and guts. Vision is important while “navigating the ever-changing industry and competitive landscape,” he said. Discipline keeps the company “on track toward our ultimate goal of being best in class.” Guts, meanwhile, entails being “willing and able to make important decisions…by relying on your experience and ingenuity.” A self-described “family-style and locally managed business,”


Apple Bus was started by Reid’s father Mike in 2000 with 12 employees and eight buses. Now it has over 2,000 employees and more than 1,500 buses. Their most recent expansion was into Anchorage, Alaska. Since 2012, the company has steadily climbed higher in the list of the top 20 school bus contac-


tors in America. It has occupied a spot on the Inc. 5000 list of fastest growing companies several times


over the last five years. “Under Reid’s direction,” Mike Oyster said, Apple Bus has


“become the industry’s envy with regard to safety and quality of service.” Reid added that, for success, it is “of paramount importance to


remember where you came from.” He said he sees Apple Bus con- tinuing to provide great service to current communities and seek out new ones to assist, all the while remaining “best in class.”


Kevin Roye Assistant Director of Pupil Transportation | Henrico County, Virginia, Public Schools


Greater and effective results are rendered with passion. Assistant Director of Pupil Trans- portation Kevin Roye practices that mantra with the mission of safely and efficiently transporting students for Henrico County Public Schools. A Virginia native and current resident of Charles City County, Roye ascend- ed the ranks quickly from lead bus driver in 2001 at age 20, to transportation supervisor two year later, to her current position in 2008 at age 27. His commitment and efforts all prioritize child safety. Roye always plays both sides of the field of management. He’ll either lead employee recruitment efforts, assess vehicle


and equipment needs to make sound recommen- dations, or analyze and provide data for day-to- day operations. He’s always on the front line addressing and resolving many daily tasks and challenging missions. He’s a key leader in his department who services 50,000 students with a fleet of over 600 buses and 700 employees.


For Roye, communication is the crux of success in his department. Team members characterize him as an affable leader devoted to his team and students


because he listens before he speaks. Director of Pupil Transpor- tation Josh Davis says most of the team recognize Roye as their confidant when dealing with operational issues and seek his counsel. No matter the project, he works closely and collectively with team members under pressure with dignity and respect to ensure the completion of any given task.


48 School Transportation News • OCTOBER 2017


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