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RESCUE EQUIPMENT


An elevated approach to safety in the wind industry Five key considerations for rescue and descent systems


According to Health & Safety Executive (HSE) statistics, across the whole of industry, falls from height accounted for nearly three in 10 fatalities in 2013/14.


The wind power industry is highly risk-aware, but no matter how well trained or experienced construction and maintenance workers are, ensuring that they have the right equipment to stay safe at height has to be one of the main considerations for health and safety managers.


FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT To ensure workers remain safe, rescue and descent devices must be an integral part of fall protection equipment. Equipment needs to offer the following…


• Capacity – equipment needs to have the capacity to handle the load required. For rescue and descent devices, this means making sure that equipment is rated to an appropriate weight capacity for the technicians using it


• Speed – in situations where it is imperative to reach the ground as quickly as possible, fast and reliable escape devices are needed. For added security, safety and peace of mind, devices with automatic descent speed control and braking systems should be specified


• Function – in an emergency, simplicity of equipment is key. Intuitive, easy- to-use equipment that enables workers to descend safely or offer rescue or assistance to other workers is potentially life-saving


• Lightweight design and durability – the wind power industry it is particularly important to invest in safety equipment that is fit-for-purpose, ensuring the equipment is able to stand up to those conditions commonly associated with the industry


• Versatility – both in terms of value and performance, high-quality rescue and descent equipment with multiple functions and options offer the optimum solution


NO MARGIN FOR ERROR When it comes to fall protection and rescue, there is no margin for error. In the high-risk environment of wind turbine construction and maintenance, safety considerations are paramount.


That is why it is essential to ensure that your height safety equipment is tailored to the work environment, the tasks being performed and the capabilities of the on- site workforce.


Jim Adams


UK Energy and Utilities Sector Sales Manager Capital Safety


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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