This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE


FEATURE SPONSOR


"Falls are a major cause of incidents, 29% of which are fatal."


As part of the package, GMS installs and maintains line retention systems for easy access to fall arrest equipment from workboats, with careful attention to anchorages, the integrity of full-body harnesses and the connecting fall-stop line and fall arrester.


LOLER also requires all appropriate lifting equipment to be marked suitably and in most cases examined regularly, both before first use at each location, through their lifetime and in exceptional circumstances. This is on their electronically-scheduled checklist. Digital records of all examinations and inspections (plus EC Declarations of Conformity) must be kept. Defects must be reported in writing.


UNWANTED BIOLOGY However, there are other less obvious hazards that have long-term consequences. The effects of bacteria and fungi carried in bird-droppings (guano) and unchecked marine growth are often forgotten and neglected. These form a major part of our service. It is estimated that 95% of bird faeces carry strains of enterococcus, 10% of which are resistant to drug treatment in humans. Fungi spores cause infection when inhaled – often unknowingly.


In addition, the corrosive effect of pH 3.0 – 4.5 uric acid formed from bird excrement accelerates the breakdown of coatings. Steelwork integrity can be compromised. Helicopter operations can also be put at risk.


These threats are avoidable – as are the negative impacts of marine growth. The rapid blooming of marine growth on areas regularly subjected to sea water can cause stress problems in several ways if not treated, which is why they pay it so much attention.


Tube diameters grow rapidly, increasing hydrodynamic loading – they occupy a larger space. An increased drag coefficient also adds to hydrodynamic loading. It can get worse. The combination of more mass, plus hydrodynamic added mass, reduces the natural frequency of structures, leading to an increased dynamic amplification factor. Meanwhile, the increased structural weight creates additional stress.


Modern coating systems are highly-resilient but do require application conditions to be near-perfect. Both are major maintenance items that cannot be ignored. To ensure high quality, inspections must be carried out by trained NACE 2 or 3 skilled operatives and yield vital baseline information for planned maintenance.


There are also detrimental effects from hydrodynamic instability such as vortex shedding.


Safety is quickly compromised too. At a purely practical level, uncontrolled marine growth can jeopardise hand and foot contact on ladders and J-tubes, leading to more incidents. Marine growth on vessel bows decreases the area of stiction and gripping. Fortunately, GMS has an armoury of solutions.


COATINGS


One of their highest priorities is paint and coating systems. These must be inspected once every 12-months at a minimum. In case this seems strange, they know that unobserved damage can cause a rapid deterioration in the competency of core structures.


This again reduces accidents caused by corrosion and leads to very welcome safety improvements.


Green Marine Solutions (GMS)


Click to view more info = Click to view video


68


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100