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INDUSTRY NEWS NEW OFFICE IN SOUTH KOREA


AAL, one of the world’s leading global breakbulk and heavy lift operators, today announced the opening of a new office in Seoul, South Korea. The move confirms the company’s commitment to strengthening its infrastructure across key markets for heavy lift, breakbulk and project cargo.


AAL has been servicing the Korean market since its inception 20 years ago and the company established a local presence in the country through the appointment of an owners’ representative in 2005. The new office will add further commercial and technical capabilities to support the company’s growing global operations and to provide its customers with more value added services.


LOGICAL STEP Wolfgang Harms, Deputy Managing Director of AAL and its Chief Representative in the North Asia Region explained: “Establishing AAL Korea was the next logical step for us in the region, and bolsters our wider international growth strategy. This move also enables us to deliver service excellence to our Korean customers, with greater on-the- ground commercial and operational support, and a smoother interconnection with our rapidly growing network across Asia.”


He added, “We have a very strong business base in Korea, built on good relationships with local customers and mutual trust. We see great potential going forward within all types of industries, and we want to invest further in our presence and the development of our brand in this important region.”


FLEXIBILITY, EFFICIENCY AND RELIABILITY Jae Hong Kim, Representative Director of AAL Korea commented, “Korea is a pivotal Asian market for our global clients. With two decades of working locally, we understand our customers’ needs and, through our bespoke tramp and regular liner services, offer flexibility, efficiency and reliability. We also provide open access to key global markets and a single-minded commitment to safe and efficient cargo handling.”


AAL


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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