This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
sauna & steam


starting young


L 62


ooking for ways to increase family memberships? Or retain the ones you already have and get those families to


visit more often? Then what about a children’s spa? Before you choke on your tea, this is


no crazy idea. Children’s spas could be an excellent way to help your members build fi tness into their family routine, and it’s also tapping into the next generation of health club members. It means parents can pop to the gym straight after the school run, don’t have to miss out on daytime workouts in the holidays and the family can visit together at weekends. “We call the children’s spa the health


nanny,” says Adrian Egger of KLAFS, which has developed a children’s spa concept currently in use in a Swiss hotel (see HCM May 11, p72). “Mum can go for a workout and the children are entertained in a healthy way. Also,


HEALTH CLUB SPA


Might UK operators consider following the European lead and offer a children’s spa facility? Kath Hudson reports


children are the clients of the future. They are decision makers – they tell their parents where to go.”


it’s working in europe KLAFS’ first children’s spa installation is


at the Steigenberger Hotel Gstaad- Saanen in Switzerland. A whole floor of the spa – 150sq m (1,615sq ft) – has been dedicated to children. It offers a sanarium, steam bath, low temperature treehouse sauna and a water grotto complete with adventure shower, waterfall, tropical raindrops, thunder and lightning. There’s also a climbing wall and a place to play Wii Fit, or just chill out. It’s aimed at fi ve- to 14-year-olds, but


Egger says children as young as three have used it, accompanied by an older sibling. So far it has been really successful.


“It makes kids feel special – they have a VIP area that adults can’t enter, which makes it feel like an adventure,” he says.


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital But can this concept, which works at


a luxury family hotel, be translated into a health club? Egger believes it can and is currently in talks with a European health club operator about designing a concept to fi t its clubs. Since this is in the early stages, the name of the operator is still under wraps. Egger says there is no standard


approach to this idea – no minimum investment or footprint – and that in each case it depends on the location and target market. However, one design feature that’s very important is that the children’s spa is separate from the adult one, so it doesn’t disturb adults trying to have some time away from kids. Egger is confi dent that, for family


operators, this is a worthwhile investment, creating a USP and also another revenue stream if a charge is made on top of the membership prices, or another membership category is added.


august 2011 © cybertrek 2011


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