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EAS Success A carnival-themed inflatable from ProFun


in the show at any one time, once you spread them out over the two halls, restaurant/meeting area and conference rooms, you could soon lose them. Clearly it would have been better if the exhibits were all contained within one hall, but it’s great that Euro Attraction Show is now so big as to offer the visitor this much choice.


EAS 2015 will take place from 6 to 8 October at the Swedish Exhibition and Congress Centre in Gothenburg – just across the road from Liseberg amusement park, which is expected to feature strongly in the week’s programme of events. And then it’s off to Barcelona in 2016.


After events in 2001 and 2002 co-located with other amusement industry trade shows (ATEI in London and Interschau in Düsseldorf), EAS took place for the first time as a standalone exhibition in January 2003, pitching up in the Italian port city of Genoa. Founded by EAASI (European Association of the Amusement Supplier Industry), it started life as the Euro Amusement Show and was rebranded as Euro Attractions Show in 2006, a year after IAAPA took over as organiser in Vienna. It has continued to move around Europe ever since, and in 2008 was held twice as the show switched from a winter to an autumn fixture. Here’s when, where and how many visitors have passed through the doors of EAS in its 11- year history:


•2003: Genoa, 5,679 visitors. •2004: Disneyland Paris, 7,234. •2005: Vienna, “More than 7,200”. •2006: Vienna, “Less than 4,000”. •2007: Seville, “More than 7,400”. •January 2008: Nice, “More than 5,000". •Sept/Oct 2008: Munich, “More than 5,000”. •2009: Amsterdam, “More than 8,000”. •2010: Rome, “More than 9,000”. •2011: London, 7,053. •2012: Berlin, 8,138. •2013: Paris, 8,584. •2014: Amsterdam, “About 10,750”


EAS signage amongst a few token Dutch bikes!


EAS PEOPLE see page 56


OCTOBER 2014


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