search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SIMULATION SOFTWARE


is carefully managed to prevent rapid wear and damage to the machine tools,” noted Biermann. “The team modified its cooling process to improve the tool life by about 50%.”


Validating the Digital Factory Aside from additive and CAE developments, the need for manufacturers to quickly design factory-floor layouts has never been greater. New digital manufacturing simulation tools like the FastSuite Edition 2 from Cenit North America (Auburn Hills, MI) help manufactures design factory layouts and vali- date all manufacturing processes in advance, speeding the process and optimizing designs.


scratch, but are often re-planned while production is running. Having the virtual factories and model plants as an exact representation of the real production systems, not just geo- metrically and kinematically, but also in regard to the logical behavior and control of the manufacturing units, guarantees agile, self-organized production units,” he said. “Digital factory allows implementation of new manufactur-


ing processes, plant concepts, and technologies that would be too expensive or even impossible without simulation- based solutions,” he added. “The more robotic applications are used—not only for simple handling tasks, but also for complex production steps—the greater the advantage of using programming and simulation tools. Software solu- tions are leading the way to these complex applications, giving the operator the necessary programming and simulation environment to make applications that were previously represented through a manual teach-in or would not show the necessary process quality. Instead of building a quick layout with 3D CAD com-


Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other software from Ansys helped researchers at the Institute of Machining Technology, Technical University of Dortmund, analyze the severe stresses put on cutting tools while machining very hard superalloys such as Inconel.


“IoT or Industry 4.0 represents the radical change that’s shaking the very foundations of the manufacturing floor. Digital factory software and 3D tools are driving that change forward,” noted Lee Van Every, Cenit North America senior account manager. “The digital factory software helps com- panies efficiently break into smart manufacturing. Nowadays, the software must be compatible with all CAD systems and work with any manufacturer’s robots and machines. This is a mandatory prerequisite for customer relationships that are becoming more and more diverse with more complex and demanding systems.” Today’s 3D-based simulation software allows visualiza- tion and validation of processes and production tasks, Van Every noted. “Production plants are seldom established from


66 AdvancedManufacturing.org | June 2017


ponents from the catalog, and then programming the scripts and macros for simulating the material flow and behavior of the cell, FastSuite Edition 2 uses the mecha- tronic components and resources for the layout definition and at the same time is defining a schematic logic for the production island, according to Van Every. “In this way, it is ensured that the simulated and real behavior match— because the simulation is based on the same logic used during the PLC programming and therefore corresponds to the real system behavior later on.” Cenit’s new FastSuite software provides user-friendly functions for integrating new, project-specific compo- nents in the layout, Van Every said. “This process must be quick and easy for users without programming knowledge to complete.” The software infrastructure is based on open standards, he added, with consistent use of AML (Automation Markup Language) as a descriptive language for system models, for example, which Van Every said allows considerably simpler interaction with engineering partners through standardized, system-neutral exchange of complete system data or equip- ment data, including kinematic and logic definitions. In addition, PLC Open ensures that the system logic at the basis of the first simulation concepts can also be used for later PLC program- ming. The software uses a shared memory in which the controls write the simulation data and from which the 3D visualization then reads the simulation data.


Image courtesy Ansys Inc.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176