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A Magna display showing the dif erent types of mat


continues to develop innovative powertrain products in response to global trends driven by legislation and consumer preferences to improve the environmental friendliness of passenger vehicles. Vehicle electrifi cation remains one of the best ways to reduce carbon emissions and increase vehicle effi ciency and will play a key role in automotive engineering over the next decade. Magna’s complete vehicle knowledge supports our


electrifi ed powertrain products. These products are based on a platform approach to maximize economies of scale where increasing numbers of vehicles will be produced with hybrid and full electric propulsion systems. New products under development at Magna include powertrain systems and modules for vehicles equipped with 48-volt systems or mild hybrids as well as high voltage systems including full hybrid, plug-in hybrid and electric vehicle powertrains.


Ridesharing


The rising popularity of ridesharing in mega cities is changing traditional vehicle use. According to industry ana- lysts, ridesharing currently represents 4% of the miles driven globally and by 2030 it is believed the number could grow to more than 26%. Miles driven by privately owned vehicles is also expected to dramatically increase over the same time period. Consequently, both are creating opportunities for automotive suppliers such as Magna.


A Magna display showing the different types of materiials in an automobile


als in an automobile.


Both advanced driver-assistance and electrifi cation tech- nologies go beyond today’s owned vehicles to include shared vehicles, ride-hailing services and new forms of short-distance travel that complement or can be integrated into public transportation. All of these modes of transportation will be smart and connected to provide convenient, safer and cleaner transportation. These advanced technologies are leading to opportunities for Magna throughout our entire product portfolio to deliver innovations for all those who share the road now and in the new mobility landscape going forward.


Conclusion


The pace of innovation development in the automotive industry is like nothing we have ever seen before. As a result, a new mobility landscape is emerging, creating even more challenges and opportunities in an enlarging ecosystem. For Magna, this means leveraging our culture of innovation internally and embracing a new level of external innovation outreach with universities, startups and other industries. Whether the next 10–20 years include an infl ux of autono- mous vehicles, electrifi cation, shared economy or new modes of transportation, Magna is ready with the expertise and global experience to help create the future of mobility.


Swamy Kotagiri is chief technology offi cer and president, Magna Electronics.


23 — Motorized Vehicle Manufacturing 2017


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