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Dead Outlet? Check before calling an electrician | safety first


When you plug a lamp or an appliance into a socket, you expect to be able to turn it on. Sometimes, though, you’ll find that the outlet is “dead.”


Before you call an electrician, check a few things out:


1. Plug something different into the same outlet. It could be that the problem is with the device and not the outlet. If this one turns on, that’s the case.


2. If more than one device is plugged into the same outlet—or if a power strip full of plugs is plugged in there, notice if everything else is working. If not, try this: Unplug one device at a time until something turns on. It could be that you’ve overloaded the outlet.


3. If nothing is turning on at that outlet, check your circuit breaker. This is usually located in the garage, basement, laundry room or a closet. Open the door and notice if a single switch is turned off; if so, turn it back on. If you can’t locate the circuit that belongs to that outlet, turn all of the breakers off and then turn them back on one at a time.


4. If you plug the lamp back into the outlet and the circuit trips again, it’s time to call an electrician.


5. And if your “dead” outlet is a GFCI outlet, you might be able to solve the problem simply by pressing the “reset” button on the face of the outlet.


For more information on electrical safety or to schedule a free electrical safety demonstration, please call your co-op at 800-780-6486.


SAVE YOUR


SPACE!


The Choctaw Electric Annual Meeting is the perfect place to showcase local crafts, artwork and business products, or increase awareness of your organization.


To reserve a free booth space, please fill out the vendor booth reservation form and submit it to CEC by September 16, 2016.


Join the fun—and reach over 1,500 CEC members, family and friends!


2016 CEC ANNUAL MEETING Vendor BoothReservation Form


Organization ___________________________________________ Contact person _________________________________________ Daytime Telephone ______________________________________


Mailing Address _________________________________________ _________________________________________


Products to be displayed/sold _______________________________ _____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________


Do you require electricity? _____Yes _____No Number of booth spaces


_______________


Vendors must bring their own tables, chairs and electrical cords. Reservation deadline: September 16, 2016


Please send booth reservation form to:


Jia Johnson, Choctaw Electric Cooperative PO Box 758, Hugo, OK 74743 ATTENTION:


All special requests must be approved prior to Annual Meeting.


SEND US EMAIL: Please email questions for Ask Your Co-op to: Jennifer Boling, jboling@choctawelectric.coop. Or, mail questions to Choctaw Electric Cooperative, PO Box 758, Hwy 93 North, Hugo,Oklahoma 74743.


CO-OP ASK YOUR


Q What's the big deal about CEC being not for profit?


Choctaw Electric is a cooperative, which means it's different than traditional businesses whose primary motive is to increase profits. Most major utilities such as OG&E and AEP have stockholders who expect a return on their investment. There's nothing wrong with that, but in some cases the drive to increase profits can result in closures and loss of jobs as companies relocate overseas.


Co-ops , being owned and controlled by local members, remain focused on local needs and concerns. There are other benefits, too: By pooling resources, people can form a co-op to provide a much needed product or service at a more reasonable price. Without electric co-ops and their members, electricity would've remained a dream for rural residents. Even today, when battles are waged between co-ops and investor-owned utilities (IOUs), the IOUs aren't interested in serving the isolated residents. They seek populated areas where revenues remain high.


By operating as a not-for-profit co-op, CEC provides a sure way for electricity to reach all rural residents. It also allows every member to have a say in business operations, something you won't find in other businesses.


sLucky Account # 38802800 ($25 Bill Credit). If the account number above belongs to you, contact your co- op by the 10th of the month to claim your $25 bill credit. Call Jennifer Boling at 800-780-6486, ext. 207, or contact CEC via email or in person.


CEC Inside Your Co-op | AUGUST 2016 | 7


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