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fields from foundry technology to metallurgy, thermo process technol- ogy and castings—guarantees trade fair success.” Held concurrently, GIFA,


METEC, Termprocess and New- cast 2015 will offer trade visitors and exhibitors from all over the world important synergies. Only one ticket is necessary to attend all four events.


GIFA First held almost 60 years ago,


GIFA, the 13th International Foundry Trade Fair with Technical Forum, is the oldest among the trade fair quartet and this year will occupy 499,000 sq. ft. of exhibit space, surpassing the record set in 1999 of 497,800 sq. ft. Regarding exhibitor numbers (801 companies), the 2015 staging is one of the most successful in the trade fair’s history. “Te phrase ‘oldie but goldie’


definitely applies to GIFA, which has maintained an excellent level for many years and will be presenting the global players of the industry again this year,” Kehrer said. “By now, 61% of the GIFA exhibi-


tors come from outside Germany,” said Project Manager Raphaela Müller. “Tis is a clear indication of GIFA’s global significance.” As in the past, Italians (113 com-


panies) represent the largest exhibitor contingent in 2015, followed by China with 79 participants and Great Britain with 42 companies. Egypt, Bulgaria and Singapore will be represented at GIFA 2015 for the first time. Te layout of GIFA 2015 will be divided into diecasting and peripheral equipment in Hall 11, gating and feeding technology in Hall 12 and foundry chemistry also in Hall 12 while pattern, mold and core mak- ing as well as foundry machinery and plants will be in Halls 15 to 17. Te product range presented at


GIFA 2015 will cover the entire mar- ket for foundry plants and equipment, diecasting machinery and melting operations. In addition, measurement and testing technology, environmental protection and waste disposal also will be important topics. With its Technical Forum and the


TECHNICAL FORUM


The WFO Technical Forum will be held on June 18, during the GIFA exhibition as drop-in sessions in the VDG technical centre in hall 13. No registration is required. All are welcome to attend as many of the papers as possible.


PROGRAM 10:45 a.m.—Opening Address, Vinod Kapur, WFO president


11 a.m.—Keynote Speech, “The Foundry of the Future-Advanced Managing and Manufacturing Concepts for a Global Competitive Cast Iron Plant” Jorge Fesch, Sakthi Portugal Group SA


11:45 a.m.—“Comparing the Foundry Industry in the United States to Europe, Using the Development of a Highly Reactive Cold-Box System as an Example” Doug Trinowski and Timm Ziehm, Huttenes Albertus


12:15 p.m.—“RFI in Nobake Foundries” C. Wilding, Omega Foundry Machinery Ltd.


12:40 p.m. Break


12:55 p.m.—“Update on Use of Blended Bentonite and Coonerdite” B. Officer and P. Verdot, Amcol Metalcasting


1:20 p.m.—“Geopol Environmental Inorganic Binder Systems” A Tagg, John Winter


1:45 p.m.—“Innovative Approach to Training—a Challenge for our Industry” Dr. P. Murrell, Cast Metals Federation


2:10 p.m.—“Novel Nobake Binders With Reduced Fume” S. Trikha, Huttenes Albertus


2:35 p.m.—“Rapid Development of New Castings Using Simulation Techniques” T. Roy, Texmaco


3 p.m.—“Improving Casting Quality and Productivity Through the Application of a High Efficiency, Engineered Lustrous Carbon formers.” N. Richardson and Vic LaFay, IMERYS Metalcasting Solutions


The Technical Forum at GIFA is organized by the Association of German Foundrymen in partnership with the World Foundrymen Organization in Hall 13.


May 2015 MODERN CASTING | 51


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