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INDUSTRY NEWS


Waupaca Wins National and Local Engineering Awards Waupaca Foundry Inc., Waupaca,


Wis., has been admitted to Wiscon- sin’s prestigious Green Tier program, a program that recognizes businesses that voluntarily meet environmental regulatory standards and proven envi- ronmental sustainability. Green Tier is administered by the Department of Natural Resources and cites more than 80 Wisconsin companies that are working with the program as environ- mental leaders in the state. Te casting facility also earned


the American Council of Engineer- ing Companies (ACEC) Engineer-


ing Excellence Award in the State of Wisconsin as well as a National ACEC Engineering Excellence Rec- ognition Award for work in promot- ing the reuse of foundry by-products to enhance the sustainability of WFI’s landfill. Waupaca Foundry has been implementing a plan to achieve sustainable growth by the year 2020, including a 25% reduction in energy consumption and 80% reduction in water consumption. “Being environmentally responsible


is not only the right thing to do, it’s the best thing to do for our employees


and our customers,” said Gary Gi- gante, president and CEO, Waupaca Foundry. “Pollution control and recy- cling ensures a healthy environment for our team members and creating a sustainable manufacturing process controls cost for our customers.” In order to earn a Green Tier designation, companies must be ISO 14001 certified, pro-actively maintain environmental standards, agree to sub- mit an annual environmental report, and be audited by the DNR. Waupaca Foundry officially received the desig- nation on March 2, 2015.


Cadillac, Detroit, will use an ad- vanced mixed-material approach for the lightweight body structure of the CT6 sedan. Te structure is alumi- num intensive, but the new Cadillac also includes 13 different materials customized for each area of the car to improve driving dynamics, fuel economy and cabin quietness. Tirteen high-pressure diecast com-


ponents make up the lower structure of the CT6 body, along with alumi- num sheets and extrusions.


Die Castings Play Structural Role in Cadillac CT6 Te CT6 debuted in March at the


New York International Auto Show and will enter production late this year at General Motors’ Detroit-Ham- tramck assembly plant. “Tis is the rocket science of auto- mobile construction and manufactur- ing today,” said Johan de Nysschen, president, Cadillac. “With the CT6, we used high-strength aluminum, high-strength steels and lightweight chassis components.” Weight reduction helps improve


fuel efficiency, contributes to desirable vehicle dynamics and aids in creat- ing a more resilient passenger cell. Sixty-four percent of the CT6 body structure is aluminum, including all exterior body panels, and the mixed material approach saved 198 lbs. (90 kg) compared to a predominately steel construction.


Nemak Invests $125M Nemak, García, Nuevo Leon, Mex-


ico, announced plans to invest $125 million in a new metalcasting facility in Garcia, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, that will produce structural and powertrain components for the North American market. Te high-pressure diecasting plant is planned to have a capacity of 2.2 million parts per year and create more than 500 jobs. Te plant will be Nemak’s 36th facility in 15 counties. “Tis facility represents a key


Cadillac’s new CT6 sedan include 13 high-pressure diecast components in the lower structure of the body.


10 | MODERN CASTING May 2015


development in the execution of our strategy,” said Armando Tamez, CEO. “It will strengthen our capacity to produce core powertrain components like engine blocks and complex trans- mission cases. Also, we will have the capacity to produce structural compo- nents, which have become an emerging source for the OEMs to reduce vehicle weight and comply with more strin- gent regulations on fuel efficiency and CO2 emissions.”


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