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Let’s


Roles reversed. Why its important to think like the customer.


Dealing with customers can be seen as one of the necessary evils of doing business, but that is short-sighted. Benjamin Dyer of Powered Now argues that seeing things from the perspective of customers can make your business life much more rewarding.


The world is changing We all know the saying “the customer is always right”. It can be irritating


because it’s simply not true. However, although the customer can be wrong, they can always win. They can waste your time, give poor reviews online, and even sue you, in extreme cases. At the same time, business needs to be won, and work is much more





that we have two ears and one mouth and should therefore listen twice as much as we talk.


The first step in treating customers with respect is to


The key to seeing things your customers' way is to put yourself in their shoes…


enjoyable if your customers are on your side. That’s why understanding customers – seeing things from their perspective – is so key to business success. It also helps you to manage the ‘customer is always right’ syndrome. See things their way The key to seeing things your customers’


way is to put yourself in their shoes. How do you feel when someone lets you down? What is your reaction to a person who doesn’t treat you with respect? Do you want to receive efficient service? These are the questions to ask yourself.


The first step to getting on with customers is to treat them as you want to be treated. Your word must be your bond When my company, Powered Now, did a


survey of more than 1,000 homeowners, 83% said their biggest irritation with trade companies was when they failed to show up when they said. That’s a big number. So although there may be good reasons why you don’t turn up as arranged, you have to understand that this will undermine trust. You use up trust at your own peril. The less trust there is, the more likely your customer will become, from your perspective, unreasonable. Treat customers with respect In sales there is a


“ well known saying 18 ToolBUSINESS+HIRE


make sure that you listen to them. In fact, if you listen carefully the first time that you meet, then play back what they are looking for, you will have gone a long way to making a sale. Little things like offering to remove your shoes, never


being fresh with customers and always cleaning up thoroughly are all part of showing respect. Researchers in the US discovered a few years ago that it’s not the incompetent doctors that get sued, it’s the arrogant


ones. There’s a lesson here for anyone running a service business. Fix mistakes as a priority Everyone wants to do a good job, but we all make mistakes. What customers want is for mistakes to be acknowledged and fixed – fast. Delaying, denying or trying to ‘fit in the work’ will all make matters worse. How would you feel? If you deal with


problems well, customers will be more loyal than if there had never been a problem in the first place. Avoid the over- picky Once in a while


you will come across customers who want the earth but want to pay


peanuts. It’s business


Trust is the magic ingredient that makes customers reasonable and that keeps them coming back…


suicide to see things from their perspective and they are best politely asked to go elsewhere. Closing the deal Trust is the magic ingredient that makes customers


reasonable and that keeps them coming back with more work. The best way to build trust is to be empathetic, or, put another way, to see things from their perspective. I believe that this approach will produce financial reward as well as a happier working environment. Good luck!


www.toolbusiness.co.uk


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