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Front Gate parkworld-online.com


BigQuestion in association with


Is VR simply prohibitively expensive for smaller parks or would you consider adding it in the future?


Paul Golder, Palace Playland: At this point in time VR is not something we have investigated enough to say whether or not it is cost prohibitive for us. Assuming the costs are at a high point right now, we would anticipate current prices to drop in the coming years as the technology advances. Perhaps at that time it would be more reasonable for smaller family parks like ours.


Wendy Crain, Belmont Park: VR has come a long way in the past 20 years. Belmont Park went all out in the early 90’s with CyberMind, the latest and greatest at the time. While VR is expensive, I think it is important for smaller parks to stay current. I believe some of Belmont Park’s success is due to the willingness to embrace the vintage while staying current. I wouldn’t be surprised at all if VR popped up at Belmont Park soon.


Andreas Andersen, Liseberg:Well, the point is, that VR can be a good tool to revamp an existing ride, if for nothing more, than just to prolong the commercial lifespan of the ride. But I do not really see the technology, as it is now, as a viable alternative to other film-based rides. Furthermore, VR lacks a social component, which I believe is a very large part of being on an attraction. You ride it together with other people. And that is not really the case, when you are isolated with a pair of VR glasses. That being said, we are introducing a VR experience at Liseberg this year, where the guests can test our 2018 vertical drop coaster Valkyria. But again, we see it more as a temporary marketing gimmick.


Figures of Fun


750 pesos is what it now costs to enter Venture Park in Cancun. It is one of very few local parks in the region charging the local currency


of the Mexican peso rather than US dollars. The reason for the change, says Venture Park’s commercial director Inigo Castillo, is because of the park’s 250,000 annual visitors, of which 70 per cent are nationals.


The Park was revamped last year as Ventura Entertainment by Selvatica, Dolphinaris and Entreteparq at a cost of $6 million. The makeover included the addition of mechanical games, water attractions, a virtual reality zone and a beach club. Prior to it becoming Venture Park, it was Cancun’s Wet n Wild for 19 years.


66,938,947


people – more than the total population of the UK - visited attractions in London last year according to the Association of Leading Visitor Attractions. So it’s no surprise that the UK’s Top 10 most visited attractions were all London based.


102


KPH is the speed at which Intamin’s LSM drive system propels the vehicle in the new Turbo Track ride at Ferrari World Abu Dhabi, followed by a 64m launch up and above the iconic roof of Yas Island, where it hits zero g and then plummets vertically back down. The ride’s12-seater vehicle is the first in the world with front- and rear-facing seats.


983,119


is the patent number of John W. Bourke’s Pleasure Railway. Created in 1911 it was simple coaster with a lift hill leading to six sections of connected U- shaped track supported by Corinthian columns. The track led riders lower and lower until they reached the end of the ride.


It was never built, but is an early example of compact roller coasters that stack track vertically within a small footprint.


APRIL 2017


5


24


32 20


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